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var regExp=new RegExp('\[:bg\]([A-Za-z\-\s]+)', 'g');
var text='something [:bg]text1[:en]text2 % something';
console.log(text.match(regExp));

I expect this fragment to return the string "text1", but it returns the following array: [":bg", ":en"]

What am I doing wrong?

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2  
This doesn't completely explain the problem, but your second character class doesn't include digits, which would prevent it from matching the 1 in test1 –  murgatroid99 Aug 9 '12 at 14:12
    
This is just an example of what I need to achieve. The digits were bad idea really. Thanks! :) –  barakuda28 Aug 9 '12 at 14:16

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Create the regular expression with regex syntax:

var regExp = /\[:bg\]([A-Za-z\-\s]+)/g;

Otherwise, you'll have to double the backslashes. When you start with a string, you must account for the fact that the string itself will be interpreted by JavaScript according to the rules of embedded metacharacters in the string constant syntax. Only then will it be re-interpreted as a regular expression by the RegExp() constructor. Thus, the string parse will "eat" your backslashes, and the regular expression will be other than what you intended.

edit — also as @Rocket points out in a comment, the "g" modifier may or may not be necessary.

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1  
He probably doesn't need the g modifier either. –  Rocket Hazmat Aug 9 '12 at 14:13
1  
I have a variable in the regex, which I have removed in the current example, so I doubled the backslashes and it is working now. Thank you very much! –  barakuda28 Aug 9 '12 at 14:15

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