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I've come across some code that reads:

if bool(x):
    doSomething

I think that the following would do the same job:

if x:
    doSomething

The reference says that it evaluates the suite if the test expression

is found to be true

The reference says of Boolean expressions:

In the context of Boolean operations, and also when expressions are used by control flow statements are used by control flow statements, the following values are interpreted as false: False, None, numeric zero of all types, and empty strings and containers ... All other values are interpreted as true.

The reference says of the bool() function:

Convert a value to a Boolean, using the standard truth testing procedure

So are the two above identical or is there some extra subtlety to it?

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1  
Simply follow the first link in the docs about if and you'll have your answer. –  phant0m Aug 9 '12 at 14:15
2  
I know what the reference says. That's why I quoted it. As the reference says, it is not a specification, and I am asking if my reading of the docs is correct. –  Joe Aug 9 '12 at 14:17
    
No, it links you to _ nonzero() _ –  phant0m Aug 9 '12 at 14:18
    
Thank you. That is not the first link in the docs about if, but does contain the vial sentence. –  Joe Aug 9 '12 at 14:22
    
If you want to quote "Called to implement truth value testing and the built-in operation bool();" as an answer, I'll tick it. Other answers have not made reference to this. –  Joe Aug 9 '12 at 14:22

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

if will use __nonzero__() if available, as does bool() when testing a value for truth. So yes, the behaviour is equivalent.

From the documentation:

In the context of Boolean operations, and also when expressions are used by control flow statements, the following values are interpreted as false: False, None, numeric zero of all types, and empty strings and containers (including strings, tuples, lists, dictionaries, sets and frozensets). All other values are interpreted as true. (See the __nonzero__() special method for a way to change this.)

object.__nonzero__(self)

Called to implement truth value testing and the built-in operation bool(); should return False or True, or their integer equivalents 0 or 1. When this method is not defined, __len__() is called, if it is defined, and the object is considered true if its result is nonzero. If a class defines neither __len__() nor __nonzero__(), all its instances are considered true.

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1  
This wasn't the first answer, but it does contain a categorical link between the if and bool() functions, so marking correct. –  Joe Aug 9 '12 at 14:23
2  
__nonzero__ is known as __bool__ in python 3.x. –  Darthfett Aug 9 '12 at 17:09

Objects are implicitly converted to bool type when they are placed in an if statement. So, for most purposes, there's no difference between x and bool(x) in an if statement. However, you will incur extra overhead if you call bool() because you are making a function call. Here's a quick test to demonstrate this:

In [7]: %timeit if(''): pass
10000000 loops, best of 3: 21.5 ns per loop

In [8]: %timeit if(bool('')): pass
1000000 loops, best of 3: 235 ns per loop
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2  
your code has mismatched loop checkers.... one is 10,000,000 the other is 1,000,000 –  Inbar Rose Aug 9 '12 at 14:17
6  
@InbarRose: no, that's just how many times timeit looped. It decided to do fewer in the second case because it was 10 times slower. The per loop is the important number. –  DSM Aug 9 '12 at 14:17
    
@DSM oh, okay :) –  Inbar Rose Aug 9 '12 at 14:18
1  
The amount of times the %timeit function repeats the code depends on how slow the code is. –  Lanaru Aug 9 '12 at 14:18

any Object that you put in an if statement will be converted to a bool based on some internal python checker, normally not an issue, there is no difference between bool(x) and (x) when inside an if statement.

however, the reason bool(x) exists is for cases such as:

return bool(x)

which would return "true or false" based on the object.

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Afaik there is no difference, if x is either '', None, 0 or False it will be converted to False.

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1  
And [] and {} and set() and... the list goes on. (Any object can be defined with a __nonzero__ method (or __bool__ for Python 3) and this controls the behaviour of if x.) –  huon-dbaupp Aug 9 '12 at 19:46

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