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I am trying to use a sorting function for grade, which will sort "name surname midterm1", but I cannot figure how to assign name and surname strings to a temp array. Any ideas?

void student_swap(struct student *x){
    int z,y,temp;
    char temp2[15];
    for(z=0; z<10; z++){
        for(y=0; y<9; y++){
            if(x[y].mid1>x[y+1].mid1){
                temp = x[y+1].mid1;
                x[y+1].mid1 = x[y].mid1;
                x[y].mid1 = temp;

                strcpy (temp2,x[y+1].name);
                strcpy (x[y+1].name,x[y].name);
                strcpy (x[y+1].name,temp2);
                strcpy (temp2,x[y+1].surname);
                strcpy (x[y+1].surname,x[y].surname);
                strcpy (x[y+1].surname,temp2);

            } // if
        } // for
    } // for
} //student_swap

Sorting int values works fine but strcpy does nothing. this is my out put code

for (i=9;i>=0;i--){
    ;
    printf ("%s %s %d\n",x[i].name,x[i].surname,x[i].mid1);
}
printf ("\n");

       student_swap(x);

    for (i=9;i>=0;i--){
    ;
    printf ("%s %s %d\n",x[i].name,x[i].surname,x[i].mid1);
}

and this is my output

murat hot 73
mehmet umur 72
idil saracoglu 55
ecem bektas 75
sevde pir 70
asli devecioglu 65
can akkurt 45
levent dogan 60
anil erdiz 30
ali durmus 40

murat hot 75
mehmet umur 73
idil saracoglu 72
ecem bektas 70
sevde pir 65
asli devecioglu 60
can akkurt 55
levent dogan 45
anil erdiz 40
ali durmus 30
share|improve this question
    
Are you sure strcpy does nothing? Have you written a test for strcpy? Are you using a debugger? –  Josh Petitt Aug 9 '12 at 15:19
    
yes , i am new to programming and i don't know how to use debugger. i am posting the rest of the code , input and output. –  Cagurtay Aug 9 '12 at 15:25
    
As an aside: Variable names like x,y,z are hard to read. Especially when x is a different type than y and z, and even more so when x is an argument and y,z are automatics. Ditto for temp and temp2. temp by itself is okay, but when you start having temp2 etc (and again, different types), its difficult to read later on and know whats going on. –  ArjunShankar Aug 9 '12 at 15:29

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Shouldn't it be:

    strcpy (temp2,x[y+1].name);
    strcpy (x[y+1].name,x[y].name);
    strcpy (x[y].name,temp2);    // <-- note the index used

?

And likewise for the surname.

share|improve this answer
    
oh ..... Thank you Michael it fixed it. –  Cagurtay Aug 9 '12 at 15:33
    
@ÇağatayCanKaraahmetoğlu - Welcome to StackOverflow. If an answer works for you, you should consider marking it 'correct'. Here's how you do it. –  ArjunShankar Aug 9 '12 at 15:53
    
thank you, i did. –  Cagurtay Aug 9 '12 at 15:57

It is good exercise to implement sorting yourself when you're learning programming. However, when writing productive code, it is always better to avoid re-inventing the wheel. For example, you could just use qsort which is supplied with stdlib.h:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

struct student { char name[100]; char surname[100]; int mid1;};

int compare_students (const void *a, const void *b)
{
  struct student *sa, *sb;
  sa = (struct student *) a;
  sb = (struct student *) b;

  if (sa->mid1 > sb->mid1)
    return -1;
  if (sa->mid1 == sb->mid1)
    return 0;

  return 1;
}

int main (void)
{
  int i;
  struct student s[4] = {
                          {.name = "a", .surname = "e", .mid1 = 10},
                          {.name = "b", .surname = "f", .mid1 = 20},
                          {.name = "c", .surname = "g", .mid1 = 99},
                          {.name = "d", .surname = "h", .mid1 = 70}
                        };
  qsort (s, 4, sizeof (struct student), compare_students);
  for (i = 0; i < 4; i++)
    printf ("%s %s: %d\n", s[i].name, s[i].surname, s[i].mid1);
  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
this was my homework and we are asked to do create our function and use it. –  Cagurtay Aug 9 '12 at 15:55
    
@Cagurtay - I totally understand that. Which is why I said 'when writing productive code'. I wrote this answer so others trying to write their own sort see this as well. –  ArjunShankar Aug 9 '12 at 15:57

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