Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.
DECLARE    
 cursor curs is select * from starting;  
 appleId number;      
 bananaId number;    
BEGIN  
    for foo in curs  
    LOOP     
        insert into apple (id, weight)  
        values(1,1)  
        returning id into appleId;  
        insert into banana(id,weight)  
        values(1,3)  
        returning id into bananaId;  
        insert into apple_banana_lookup  
        values(1,appleId,bananaId);  
    END LOOP;  
    COMMIT;   
END;  

The above code results in a foreign key constraint violation. Claiming that the ID field in Apple does not yet exist. My question is how do I make this code function above and have the apple_banana_lookup table successfully persist the keys referenced in appleId and bananaId . As an added I want to avoid having to commit after every insert into apple and banana on account of there will be ~200 millions records in a given cursor.

UPDATE

Schema declaration:

    create table apple  
    ( 
        id number(20,0) not null, 
        weight number (20,0)   
    );

    create table banana  
    (   
         id number(20,0) not null, 
         weight number(20,0)  
    )  ;

    create table apple_banana_lookup  
( 
      id number(20,0) not null,
      appleId number(20,0) not null,
      bananaId number(20,0) not null   
      CONSTRAINT "apple_fk" foreign key ("appleId")  
      REFERENCES "apple" ("id"),  
     CONSTRAINT "banana_fk" foreign key ("bananaId")  
      REFERENCES "banana" ("id"),
);  

ERROR MESSAGE:

ORA-02291: integrity constraint  
parent key not found
share|improve this question
    
Can you try commit after the second insert. –  Annjawn Aug 9 '12 at 15:37
    
@Annjawn I have tried this and it results in the same error –  Woot4Moo Aug 9 '12 at 15:40
    
id in apple_banana_lookup shouldn't be necessary, as one would assume the tuple [appleId, bananaId] would be unique... And 200 million rows seems like a lot to handle in one transaction - depending on a number of other factors, your system may just lock the table. Also, why a cursor? They tend to indicate imperative thinking, when SQL was really meant to deal with sets. Could you get away with just a standard set of INSERTs? –  Clockwork-Muse Aug 9 '12 at 15:54
    
@X-Zero if I do that I end up doing three tables reads from the starting table. Because I have to take the disjunction between apple and starting and banana and starting and then take the disjunction from my lookup table –  Woot4Moo Aug 9 '12 at 15:56
    
Okay, I see what you're getting at. Is the performance savings that great? I would have thought that using a cursor would have turned it into a RBAR (row-by-agonizing-row) situation. –  Clockwork-Muse Aug 9 '12 at 16:07

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Something appears to be left out of your explanation-- your code appears to work correctly when the tables are created correctly

I'm assuming that this is how the apple, banana, and apple_banana_lookup tables are defined (note that since you don't specify the column list on your insert into apple_banana_lookup, I'm assuming that the columns in the table are ordered as your PL/SQL block seems to expect them to be).

SQL> create table apple(
  2    id number primary key,
  3    weight number
  4  );

Table created.

SQL> create table banana(
  2    id number primary key,
  3    weight number
  4  );

Table created.

SQL> create table apple_banana_lookup (
  2    id number primary key,
  3    appleID number references apple(id),
  4    bananaID number references banana(id)
  5  );

Table created.

Just to avoid making any changes to your code, I created a starting table with 1 row

SQL> create table starting( id number );

Table created.

SQL> insert into starting values( 1 );

1 row created.

Now I run your code exactly as you posted it. No errors are generated and one row is inserted into each table.

SQL> DECLARE
  2   cursor curs is select * from starting;
  3   appleId number;
  4   bananaId number;
  5  BEGIN
  6      for foo in curs
  7      LOOP
  8          insert into apple (id, weight)
  9          values(1,1)
 10          returning id into appleId;
 11          insert into banana(id,weight)
 12          values(1,3)
 13          returning id into bananaId;
 14          insert into apple_banana_lookup
 15          values(1,appleId,bananaId);
 16      END LOOP;
 17      COMMIT;
 18  END;
 19  /

PL/SQL procedure successfully completed.

SQL> select * from apple_banana_lookup;

        ID    APPLEID   BANANAID
---------- ---------- ----------
         1          1          1
share|improve this answer
    
hmm I may have missed something transcribing to hide the names let me check. –  Woot4Moo Aug 9 '12 at 15:51
create table apple  
( 
    id number(20,0) not null, 
    weight number (20,0)   
);  --No primary keys here

create table banana  
(   
     id number(20,0) not null, 
     weight number(20,0)  
)  ;  -- No primary keys here


create table apple_banana_lookup  
( 
      id number(20,0) not null,
      appleId number(20,0) not null,
      bananaId number(20,0) not null,   
      CONSTRAINT apple_fk foreign key (appleId)  
      REFERENCES apple(id),   --this wont work
     CONSTRAINT banana_fk foreign key (bananaId)  
      REFERENCES banana(id)  --this wont work
);  

Doesn't look like the statements above for creating apple_banana_lookup would work. The referential integrity on table apple_banana_lookup needs to refer to a unique key on the referencing tables. Here's what it should be

create table apple  
( 
  id number(20,0) not null, 
  weight number (20,0) ,
  CONSTRAINT apple_pk PRIMARY KEY (id)
);

create table banana  
(   
  id number(20,0) not null, 
  weight number(20,0) , 
  CONSTRAINT banana_pk PRIMARY KEY (id)
)  ;

create table apple_banana_lookup  
( 
      id number(20,0) not null,
      appleId number(20,0) not null,
      bananaId number(20,0) not null,  
      CONSTRAINT app_ban_pk PRIMARY KEY (appleId, bananaId),
      CONSTRAINT apple_fk foreign key (appleId)  
      REFERENCES apple(id),  
     CONSTRAINT banana_fk foreign key (bananaId)  
      REFERENCES banana(id)
); 

So having this, the below works like a charm (which is same as yours except the loop)-

SQL> DECLARE    
 appleId number;      
 bananaId number;    
BEGIN    
        insert into apple (id, weight)  
        values(1,1)  
        returning id into appleId;  
        insert into banana(id,weight)  
        values(1,3)  
        returning id into bananaId;  
        insert into apple_banana_lookup  
        values(1,appleId,bananaId);      
    COMMIT;   
END; 
/

PL/SQL block completed successfully.


SQL> select * from apple;
                  ID               WEIGHT
-------------------- --------------------
                   1                    1

SQL> select * from banana;
                  ID               WEIGHT
-------------------- --------------------
                   1                    3 

SQL> select * from apple_banana_lookup;
                  ID              APPLEID             BANANAID
-------------------- -------------------- --------------------
                   1                    1                    1 
share|improve this answer
    
I am not sure what you mean by this is not correct. I wrote what was in my oracle DDL with changed names –  Woot4Moo Aug 9 '12 at 15:54
    
if you refer to apple(id) on your foreign key clause, then apple table id column should be the unique primary key, and the same applies for banana(id) –  Annjawn Aug 9 '12 at 16:00

AFAIR The data is always visible within the transaction, so you should be able to reference the data that was inserted in previous INSERT statements.
I suspect that the error refers to field names, NOT field values. If your gave us a little more details of the error then we would be able to help better.
Check your constraint source too.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.