Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Can some body help me as how to find how much time and how much memory does it take for a code in python?

share|improve this question
    
See this question for calculating total memory used. –  machow Aug 9 '12 at 15:43
    
Did my answer help you? –  Daniel Li Oct 3 '12 at 15:57
    
yes indeed incase of time. –  hafizul asad Oct 4 '12 at 20:08
add comment

2 Answers 2

Use this for calculating time:

import time

time_start = time.clock()
#run your code
time_elapsed = (time.clock() - time_start)

As referenced by the Python documentation:

time.clock()

On Unix, return the current processor time as a floating point number expressed in seconds. The precision, and in fact the very definition of the meaning of “processor time”, depends on that of the C function of the same name, but in any case, this is the function to use for benchmarking Python or timing algorithms.

On Windows, this function returns wall-clock seconds elapsed since the first call to this function, as a floating point number, based on the Win32 function QueryPerformanceCounter(). The resolution is typically better than one microsecond.

Reference: http://docs.python.org/library/time.html


Use this for calculating memory:

import resource

resource.getrusage(resource.RUSAGE_SELF).ru_maxrss

Reference: http://docs.python.org/library/resource.html

share|improve this answer
    
This will get his time but not memory used. –  edhedges Aug 9 '12 at 15:37
    
thanx...i am using python in windows and i think the memory calculation u described is for linux?? –  hafizul asad Aug 9 '12 at 15:51
    
It works for Windows as well. Read the description above. –  Daniel Li Aug 9 '12 at 15:59
    
import resource resource.getrusage(resource.RUSAGE_SELF).ru_maxrss –  hafizul asad Aug 9 '12 at 17:29
    
This gives an error in python (windows) ,import resource resource.getrusage(resource.RUSAGE_SELF).ru_maxrss –  hafizul asad Aug 9 '12 at 17:29
add comment

Use a memory profiler like guppy

>>> from guppy import hpy; h=hpy()
>>> h.heap()
Partition of a set of 48477 objects. Total size = 3265516 bytes.
Index  Count   %     Size   % Cumulative  % Kind (class / dict of class)
     0  25773  53  1612820  49   1612820  49 str
     1  11699  24   483960  15   2096780  64 tuple
     2    174   0   241584   7   2338364  72 dict of module
     3   3478   7   222592   7   2560956  78 types.CodeType
     4   3296   7   184576   6   2745532  84 function
     5    401   1   175112   5   2920644  89 dict of class
     6    108   0    81888   3   3002532  92 dict (no owner)
     7    114   0    79632   2   3082164  94 dict of type
     8    117   0    51336   2   3133500  96 type
     9    667   1    24012   1   3157512  97 __builtin__.wrapper_descriptor
<76 more rows. Type e.g. '_.more' to view.>
>>> h.iso(1,[],{})
Partition of a set of 3 objects. Total size = 176 bytes.
 Index  Count   %     Size   % Cumulative  % Kind (class / dict of class)
     0      1  33      136  77       136  77 dict (no owner)
     1      1  33       28  16       164  93 list
     2      1  33       12   7       176 100 int
>>> x=[]
>>> h.iso(x).sp
 0: h.Root.i0_modules['__main__'].__dict__['x']
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.