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What is the fastest way to check if a string matches a regular expression in Ruby?

My problem is that I have to "egrep" through a huge list of strings to find which are the ones that match a regexp that is given at runtime. I only care about whether the string fits the regexp, not where it matches what is the content of the matching groups. I hope this assumption can be used to reduce the amount of time my code spend matching regexps.

I load the regexp with

pattern = Regexp.new(ptx).freeze

I have found that string =~ pattern is slightly faster than string.match(pattern).

Are there other tricks or shortcuts that can used to make this test even faster?

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If you don't care about the content of the matching groups, why do you have them? You can make the regex faster by converting them to non-capturing. –  Mark Thomas Aug 9 '12 at 16:09
1  
Since the regexp is provided at run-time, I assume it's unconstrained, in which case there may be internal references within the reg-exp to groupings, and therefore converting them to non-capturing by modifying the regexp could modify the result (unless you additionally check for internal references, but the problem becomes increasingly complex). I find it curious =~ would be faster than string.match. –  djconnel Aug 9 '12 at 16:59
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4 Answers

A simple code :

require 'benchmark'

"test123" =~ /1/
=> 4
Benchmark.measure{ 1000000.times { "test123" =~ /1/ } }
=>   0.610000   0.000000   0.610000 (  0.578133)

"test123"[/1/]
=> "1"
Benchmark.measure{ 1000000.times { "test123"[/1/] } }
=>   0.718000   0.000000   0.718000 (  0.750010)

irb(main):019:0> "test123".match(/1/)
=> #<MatchData "1">
Benchmark.measure{ 1000000.times { "test123".match(/1/) } }
=>   1.703000   0.000000   1.703000 (  1.578146)

So =~ is faster but it depend what you want to have in result. If you just want to check if a text contain a regex or not use =~

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As I wrote, I already found that =~ is faster than match, with a less dramatic performance increase when operating on bigger regexps. What I am wondering is if there is any strange way to make this check even faster, maybe exploiting some strange method in Regexp or some weird construct. –  gioele Aug 9 '12 at 19:23
    
I think there is no other solutions –  Dougui Aug 10 '12 at 13:58
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up vote 7 down vote accepted

This is the benchmark I have run after finding some articles around the net. The winner seems to be re =~ str, although str =~ re is almost as fast.

#!/usr/bin/ruby
require 'benchmark'

str = "aacaabc"
re = Regexp.new('a+b').freeze

N = 1_000_000

Benchmark.bm do |b|
    b.report("str.match re\t") { N.times { str.match re } }
    b.report("str =~ re\t")    { N.times { str =~ re } }
    b.report("str[re]  \t")    { N.times { str[re] } }
    b.report("re =~ str\t")    { N.times { re =~ str } }
    b.report("re.match str\t") { N.times { re.match str } }
end

Results (MRI 1.8.7):

$ ./bench-re.rb  | sort -t $'\t' -k 2
                     user     system      total        real
re =~ str         1.220000   0.140000   1.360000 (  1.355808)
str =~ re         1.260000   0.130000   1.390000 (  1.390515)
str[re]           1.380000   0.180000   1.560000 (  1.565150)
re.match str      1.570000   0.150000   1.720000 (  1.715152)
str.match re      1.810000   0.140000   1.950000 (  1.947868)

Results (MRI 1.9.3-p0):

$ ruby bench-re.rb  | sort -t $'\t' -k 2
                    user     system      total        real
str =~ re         0.680000   0.000000   0.680000 (  0.682524)
re =~ str         0.690000   0.000000   0.690000 (  0.687740)
str[re]           0.810000   0.000000   0.810000 (  0.807223)
re.match str      1.380000   0.000000   1.380000 (  1.380181)
str.match re      1.470000   0.000000   1.470000 (  1.473722)

Results (MRI 2.1.1):

$ ruby bench-re.rb  | sort -t $'\t' -k 2
                    user     system      total        real
re =~ str         1.090000   0.000000   1.090000 (  1.098284)
str =~ re         1.120000   0.000000   1.120000 (  1.125099)
str[re]           1.370000   0.000000   1.370000 (  1.364734)
re.match str      1.390000   0.000000   1.390000 (  1.383809)
str.match re      1.610000   0.000000   1.610000 (  1.610278)
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Depending on how complicated your regular expression is, you could possibly just use simple string slicing. I'm not sure about the practicality of this for your application or whether or not it would actually offer any speed improvements.

'testsentence'['stsen']
=> 'stsen' # evaluates to true
'testsentence'['koala']
=> nil # evaluates to false
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I cannot use string slicing because the regexp is provided at run-time and I do not have any control over that. –  gioele Aug 9 '12 at 19:18
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What about re === str (case compare)? Since it evaluates to true or false and has no need for storing matches, returning match index and that stuff, I wonder if it would be an even faster way of matching than =~

EDIT: ok tested this, =~ is still faster , even if you have multiple capture groups (however it is faster than the other options)

btw. what good is the ".freeze"? I couldn't measure any performance boost from it

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