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How can I write unit test to the following code:

public Image Get(BrowserName browser)
{
    // if no screenshot mode specified it means that regular screenshot needed
    return this.Get(browser, ScreenshotMode.Regular);
}

public Image Get(BrowserName browser, ScreenshotMode mode) {            
    // some code omitted here
}
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4  
why not make it call a common private method? –  Davin Tryon Aug 9 '12 at 15:57

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

That's typically done with a partial mock, and they can be a little yucky.

First, the method you are mocking must be virtual. Otherwise Rhino Mocks can't intercept the method. So let's change your code to this:

public Image Get(BrowserName browser)
{
    // if no screenshot mode specified it means that regular screenshot needed
    return this.Get(browser, ScreenshotMode.Regular);
}

public virtual Image Get(BrowserName browser, ScreenshotMode mode) {            
    // some code omitted here
}

Note that the second method is virtual now. We can then setup our partial mock like so:

//Arrange
var yourClass = MockRepository.GeneratePartialMock<YourClass>();
var bn = new BrowserName();
yourClass.Expect(m => m.Get(bn, ScreenshotMode.Regular));

//Act
yourClass.Get(bn);

//Assert
yourClass.VerifyAllExpectations();

That's with the AAA Rhino Mocks syntax. If you prefer to use record / playback, you can use that too.


So that's how you would do it. A possibly better solution is if ScreenshotMode is an enum and you have C# 4 at your disposal, just make it an optional parameter:

public Image Get(BrowserName browser, ScreenshotMode mode = ScreenshotMode.Regular)
{
    //Omitted code.
}

Now you don't have two methods, so there is no need to test that one calls another.

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Two more possibilities besides making methods virtual (as vcsjones explained):

1)

Write a test for Get(browser, mode) with mode being Regular. Then run the same test against Get(browser).

After all both are supposed to return exactly the same results.

or 2)

Extract the code of the second Get-method into a class with an interface and make it injectable into the tested class. Call it with:

public Image Get(BrowserName browser) {
  return whatever.Get(browser, ScreenshotMode.Regular);
}

public Image Get(BrowserName browser, ScreenshotMode mode) {   
  return whatever.Get(browser, mode);
}

Now during testing you can inject a mock and verify that the first Get-method calls it with ScreenshotMode.Regular, while the second Get-method just passes the mode on.

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