Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to create a client-side api for a web control using the Prototype pattern. However I want to make life easier by not having to manage "this".

This is some sample code (i have commented the problematic line):

MyObject = function ()
{
    MyObject.initializeBase(this);

    this._someProperty = null;
};    

MyObject.prototype = {

    initialize: function()
    {
        // Init
    },

    get_someProperty: function()
    {
        return this._someProperty;
    },

    set_someProperty: function(value)
    {
        this._someProperty = value;
    },    

    doSomething: function ()
    {
        $('.some-class').each(function ()
        {
            $(this).click(this.doClick);  // this.doClick is wrong
        });
    },

    doClick: function ()
    {
        alert('Hello World');
    }
};

Normally, using the revealing module pattern I would declare a private variable:

var that = this;

Can I do something similar with the Prototype pattern?

share|improve this question
    
So what is the problem again? –  PhD Aug 9 '12 at 16:26
    
I want to avoid littering my code with managing "this" scope. –  Brett Postin Aug 9 '12 at 16:34
    
@Poz Sadly, you are programming in the wrong language if you want to avoid managing this. –  Alex Wayne Aug 9 '12 at 16:35
    
I don't really get your problem. What do you expect? How would ECMAscript know which object you mean by referencing this twice within the same scope ? –  jAndy Aug 9 '12 at 16:42
    
@AlexWayne is this convention uncommon/bad? I tend to do it a lot in the revealing module/prototype patterns... tinyurl.com/7dxkw –  Brett Postin Aug 9 '12 at 16:44

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can do the exact same thing you are used to, just do it within the doSomething method:

doSomething: function ()
{
    var instance = this;
    $('.some-class').each(function ()
    {
        $(this).click(instance.doClick);
    });
},

This approach has nothing to with prototype or not, it's just how to manage context with nested functions. So when a function on a prototype (method) has nested functions within in, you may have to preserve the context this at any of those level if you want to access it in a nested scope.

share|improve this answer
1  
I think the point was that he didn't want to do what you posted. He wanted a "that" that is accessible in all methods and points to the correct this. –  Matt Crinklaw-Vogt Aug 9 '12 at 16:29
    
Well that's just how you do this javascript. this needs to be managed when nested function scope is involved. Not a way around it. Unless you want to jumped into coffee script's fat arrow => but I try not evangelize coffee script in every JS post :p –  Alex Wayne Aug 9 '12 at 16:34
    
Thanks Alex, I could live with this solution. However as Matt points out it would be great if I had a single reference of "this" to point to. –  Brett Postin Aug 9 '12 at 16:36
    
Then use CoffeeScript and let the compiler deal with it :) tinyurl.com/9392ab5 –  Alex Wayne Aug 9 '12 at 16:38
    
If you are attaching methods to your prototype I think this is the only solution. You could define the methods in your constructor but that actually wastes a lot of memory: gist.github.com/3073687 –  Matt Crinklaw-Vogt Aug 9 '12 at 16:39

ES5's Function.prototype.bind() might be an option for you. You could go like

doSomething: function ()
{
    $('.some-class').each(function(_, node)
    {
        $(node).click(this.doClick);  // this.doClick is right
    }.bind(this));
},

Now, we proxied each event handler by invoking .bind() and as a result, we call it in the context of the prototype object. The caveat here is, you no longer have this referencing the actuall DOM node, so we need to use the passed in arguments from jQuery instead.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.