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I have a method that A) inserts a row in a table and then B) uses the resulting Identity value in several inserts in another table. If the logic in part B fails for any reason, I need to rollback all of the inserts for both parts B and A. I'm fairly certain that transactions would not work for this, although I'm open to being persuaded otherwise. I have a "main" method that handles the calling to the methods that perform both A and B, which are surrounded by a try-catch. What I'm wondering is, if I call a method that performs rollback functionality from the main method's catch, and something fails in the rollback method, will the exception caught (I want to log it) in the rollback method wipe out the stack trace (or anything else) of the exception caught in the main method? Code example:

public class DoSomeStuff
{
    public void MainMethod(...)
    {
         int identity;
         try
         {
              identity = DoFirstInsert(...);
              DoSubsequentInserts(identity, ....);
         }
         catch
         {
              RollbackStuff(identity);
              throw;
         }
    }

    void RollbackStuff(int identity)
    {
         try
         {
              //Do database stuff to rollback inserts
         }
         catch(exception ex)
         {
              //Log rollback error, DO NOT THROW
              //Will this wipe out the exception caught in MainMethod()?
         }
    }
}

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
Thanks to both responders. I refactored the class to use a transaction as John Saunders suggested and it works exactly the way I want it to. –  AJ. Jul 27 '09 at 15:56
    
Great. "For posterity", would you mind posting the pseudo-code for the case with transactions (after the original code)? Also, you should change the title if you get a chance. I'm not sure I'd change it correctly. –  John Saunders Jul 27 '09 at 16:20

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Transactions should work. Wrap all of the inserts in a single transaction, including the one that returns the identity column.

share|improve this answer

No, the exception will not be wiped out. I created a console application as follows to test it:

using System;

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Program p = new Program();

            try
            {
                p.MainMethod();
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("=== Insert Exception ===");
                Console.WriteLine(ex.ToString());
                Console.WriteLine();
            }

            Console.ReadLine();
        }

        public void MainMethod()
        {
            int identity = 0;
            try
            {
                identity = DoFirstInsert();
                DoSubsequentInsert(identity);
            }
            catch
            {
                RollbackStuff(identity);
                throw;
            }
        }

        private void RollbackStuff(int identity)
        {
            try
            {
                throw new Exception("Exception on rollback");
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("=== Rollback Exception===");
                Console.WriteLine(ex.ToString());
                Console.WriteLine();
            }
        }

        private void DoSubsequentInsert(int identity)
        {
            throw new Exception("Exception on insert");
        }

        private int DoFirstInsert()
        {
            return 1;
        }
    }
}

share|improve this answer
    
Although this answers your question about exceptions, John Saunder's answer about Transactions is definitely the best way to go to manage rollbacks. –  Malcolm Jul 27 '09 at 15:38

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