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I have the following query , I was going through Java immutable class concept and come up with the following analysis..

  • All the fields must be private and preferably final
  • Ensure the class cannot be overridden - make the class final, or use static factories and keep constructors private
  • Fields must be populated from the Constructor/Factory
  • Don't provide any setters for the fields
  • Watch out for collections. Use Collections.unmodifiable*.
  • Also, collections should contain only immutable Objects
  • All the getters must provide immutable objects or use defensive copying
  • Don't provide any methods that change the internal state of the Object.

Now I have the following class..

public final class Bill {

    private final int amount;
    private final DateTime dateTime;
    private final List<Integers> orders;

}

Please advise how it can be made as immutable class.

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2  
Not all of these are technically required -- for example, String.hashCode() is lazily computed, and its hashCode field isn't final, but String is considered immutable even so. –  Louis Wasserman Aug 9 '12 at 16:40
    
> its hashCode field isn't final that's why it is mentioned that the fields are preferred to be final. As long as they are not modifiable due to an external message to the object, it's fine for the members to be non-final, right? –  Vikdor Aug 9 '12 at 16:46

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Your class as it is is immutable. Now you probably want to add a few methods:

public final class Bill {

    private final int amount;
    private final DateTime dateTime;
    private final List<Integers> orders;

    public Bill(int amount, DateTime dateTime, List<Integer> orders) {
        this.amount = amount; //primitive type: ok
        this.dateTime = dateTime; //joda.DateTime is immutable: ok
        this.orders = new ArrayList<Integer> (orders); //make a copy as the caller could modify the list at its end
    }

    // no method that adds or removes from the list

   public List<Integer> getOrders() {
       return Collections.unmodifiableList(orders); //defensive copy
   }
}

Alternatively, you can use this.orders = Collections.unmodifiableList(orders); in the constructor and return it from getOrders(): return orders;, which enforces the fact that you should not modify that list, even within your class.

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Since int is a primitive and DataTime (from JodaTime, I guess) is immutable, the only thing you need to do is to ensure that you use immutable list:

public final class Bill {
    ...
    public Bill(int amount, DateTime dateTime, List<Integer> orders) {
        this.amount = amount;
        this.dateTime = dateTime;
        this.orders = Collections.unmodifiableList(orders);
    }
    ...
}

Obviously, you also need a constructor to initialize final fields and some methods that would access that fields.

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Since amount is a value type, datetime is unmodifiable, if you return a Collections.unmodifiable() version of your orders attribute in its getter, the class would become immutable.

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