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I have read the algorithm to delete the root element of heap. 1. Swap the root element with last element of the heap. 2. Then heapify (shift down) from the root element downwards.

At few other places, I find that they heapify upwards from the last element's parent towards root.(i.e., check deleteTop() function here http://www.geeksforgeeks.org/archives/14873) Hence confused with the right approach :-( Does this vary based on the situation or the article itself is wrong?

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Is there anything inherently wrong with heapifying (is that a word?) in different directions? –  Dennis Meng Aug 9 '12 at 16:46
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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The code of deleteTop() is wrong.

When given this max-heap and running deleteTop():

        10
     8      7
    5 4    3 2
        ||
        ||
        \/ 

        2
     8     7
    5 4   3 10
        ||
        ||
        \/ 

        7
     8     2
    5 4   3 10

The resulting heap is wrong since 2<(3 and 10)

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At few other places, I find that they heapify upwards from the last element's parent towards root.(i.e., check deleteTop() function here http://www.geeksforgeeks.org/archives/14873)

The inline comments for heapify() clearly say the implementation was adapted for the median streaming problem; however, in a generic heap structure implementation, heapify() bubbles down. See this Algorithms lecture for a detailed explanation of heap implementation and the median streaming problem.

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I believe the heap sorting concept is simply to identify the largest or smallest element and remove it from heap... you can do it either way so it's different implementation of the algorithm.

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