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I'm writing a python program to work out some things from a Wikipedia dump.

However, one of the things that I've noticed when working with large data sets with large amounts of disk usage is that performance almost always degrades over time.

My computer is a core i7 2.6 GHz, 16 Gb ram (reaching about 5 Gb usage), with a 1 Tb 7200 RPM hard drive.

Note: In both these cases, the output is given in 10 second increments.

This is using Redis and Python 2.7

[ ] T:251.02 articles/second R: 4628 A: 15474
[ ] T:247.13 articles/second R: 5111 A: 17151
[ ] T:246.41 articles/second R: 5487 A: 19177
[ ] T:258.10 articles/second R: 6200 A: 22217
[ ] T:259.90 articles/second R: 6833 A: 24382
[ ] T:265.22 articles/second R: 7685 A: 26864
[ ] T:274.25 articles/second R: 8981 A: 29488
[ ] T:281.50 articles/second R: 10094 A: 32209
[ ] T:286.51 articles/second R: 11283 A: 34639
[ ] T:296.26 articles/second R: 13033 A: 37414
[ ] T:301.68 articles/second R: 14484 A: 39906
[ ] T:289.22 articles/second R: 14704 A: 40333
[ ] T:277.45 articles/second R: 14940 A: 40634
[ ] T:267.82 articles/second R: 15243 A: 41083
[ ] T:259.04 articles/second R: 15502 A: 41570
[ ] T:250.92 articles/second R: 15778 A: 42014
[ ] T:243.67 articles/second R: 16075 A: 42486
[ ] T:236.79 articles/second R: 16356 A: 42924
[ ] T:230.48 articles/second R: 16649 A: 43358
[ ] T:223.89 articles/second R: 16826 A: 43705
[ ] T:218.44 articles/second R: 17039 A: 44205
[ ] T:213.30 articles/second R: 17234 A: 44705
[ ] T:208.41 articles/second R: 17354 A: 45253
[ ] T:203.60 articles/second R: 17473 A: 45725
[ ] T:199.61 articles/second R: 17627 A: 46329
[ ] T:195.65 articles/second R: 17807 A: 46872
[ ] T:191.64 articles/second R: 17875 A: 47398
[ ] T:188.28 articles/second R: 18003 A: 48008
[ ] T:185.11 articles/second R: 18233 A: 48517

Obviously Redis could be my problem, here's some results without using Redis.

[ ] T:1636.31 articles/second R:3938 A:12949
[ ] T:3716.77 articles/second R:19834 A:61210
[ ] T:2776.43 articles/second R:20213 A:68211
[ ] T:2128.70 articles/second R:20228 A:68867
[ ] T:1729.78 articles/second R:20251 A:69586
[ ] T:1462.91 articles/second R:20289 A:70338
[ ] T:1270.07 articles/second R:20309 A:71107
[ ] T:1124.34 articles/second R:20330 A:71857
[ ] T:1011.18 articles/second R:20376 A:72669
[ ] T:919.88 articles/second R:20391 A:73464
[ ] T:845.36 articles/second R:20406 A:74304
[ ] T:783.06 articles/second R:20417 A:75158
[ ] T:730.05 articles/second R:20427 A:75984
[ ] T:684.37 articles/second R:20436 A:76798
[ ] T:645.07 articles/second R:20451 A:77661
[ ] T:610.67 articles/second R:20475 A:78518

This isn't 'real' performance as I'm not storing the data anywhere (just incrementing the number of articles and redirects). But we can see the same decline in performance over time.

Is the performance when the program is first starting real, or has it not reached stability yet? As I'm not writing any log files or anything, it seems like performance should be relatively constant since I'm continually reading from the hard drive (granted it will jump around a lot to access all the files).

I know it's likely poor form to put large amounts of data in a queue, but I figured it would be better to have a single process handling data reads rather than distributing files to read to 7 other processes causing a seek storm. I tried both ways (putting file paths in a queue, and putting the actual data in the queue) and putting the data in the queue was a touch faster.

from redis import Redis
import time
import re
from multiprocessing import Process, Queue

r = Redis()
r.flushdb()

doubleBrackets = re.compile("\[\[(.*?)\]\]")

def findLinks(q, oq):
    while True:
        if not q.empty():
            title, lines = q.get()
            links = []
            for line in lines:
                for l in doubleBrackets.findall(line):
                    l = l.split('|')[0]
                    l = l.strip('|')
                    links.append(l)
                    #r.rpush(title, l)

            if len(links) == 1:
                oq.put(0)
                #r.incr('Redirects')
            else:
                oq.put(1)
                #r.incr('Articles')

numArticles = 0
numRedirects = 0

print 'Starting'

# This is a 1 Gb file with the paths to all the files I am accessing
linkFile = '/home/andrew/Wikipedia/logFileAll'

q = Queue()
oq = Queue()
processes = []

for i in range(7):
    p = Process(target=findLinks, args=(q,oq))
    processes.append(p)
    p.start()

startTime = time.time()
timer = time.time()

with open(linkFile, 'rb') as f:
    while True:
        line = f.readline()

        # The data is formatted so the title and path are separated by a single space
        title, path = line.split(' ')

        with open(path.strip(), 'rb') as fi:
            # Here we read the article
            lines = fi.readlines()

        # We put the title and the article content in the queue
        q.put((title, lines))

        if time.time() - timer > 10:
            # If using Redis
            #print '[ ] T:%.2f articles/second R: %s A: %s' %((int(r.get('Redirects'))+int(r.get('Articles')))/(time.time()-startTime), r.get('Redirects'), r.get('Articles'))

            # Test for redis dependent performance
            while not oq.empty():
                response = oq.get()
                if response:
                    numArticles += 1
                else:
                    numRedirects += 1    
            print '[ ] T:%.2f articles/second R:%s A:%s' %((numArticles+numRedirects)/(time.time()-startTime), numRedirects, numArticles)
            timer = time.time()

# When we run through the 1 Gb file, we will still have a couple more items to chew through
while True:
    if time.time() - timer > 10:
        print '[ ] R: %s A: %s C:%s' %(r.get('Redirects'), r.get('Articles'), title)
        timer = time.time()

EDIT: From J.F. Sebastian's comments, I added sentinel values instead of the q.empty() checks. It seems like some processes got stuck somewhere, but did not throw exceptions (kind of odd that would happen), anyway, here's the performance increase! Thanks!

[ ] T:250.88 articles/second R:663 A:1850 Proc:7
[ ] T:257.17 articles/second R:1216 A:3940 Proc:7
[ ] T:259.92 articles/second R:1820 A:6000 Proc:7
[ ] T:251.81 articles/second R:2337 A:7762 Proc:7
[ ] T:250.04 articles/second R:2943 A:9590 Proc:7
[ ] T:248.24 articles/second R:3543 A:11389 Proc:7
[ ] T:246.83 articles/second R:4060 A:13260 Proc:7
[ ] T:247.59 articles/second R:4583 A:15271 Proc:7
[ ] T:243.97 articles/second R:5074 A:16938 Proc:7
[ ] T:242.01 articles/second R:5440 A:18819 Proc:7
[ ] T:252.34 articles/second R:6086 A:21741 Proc:7
[ ] T:255.94 articles/second R:6738 A:24053 Proc:7
[ ] T:261.38 articles/second R:7547 A:26518 Proc:7
[ ] T:268.01 articles/second R:8617 A:29000 Proc:7
[ ] T:276.48 articles/second R:9933 A:31648 Proc:7
[ ] T:283.45 articles/second R:11114 A:34358 Proc:7
[ ] T:293.25 articles/second R:12836 A:37148 Proc:7
[ ] T:302.41 articles/second R:14567 A:40015 Proc:7
[ ] T:313.33 articles/second R:16553 A:43147 Proc:7
[ ] T:320.35 articles/second R:17699 A:46551 Proc:7
[ ] T:328.72 articles/second R:18966 A:50261 Proc:7
[ ] T:337.07 articles/second R:19645 A:54724 Proc:7
[ ] T:349.34 articles/second R:19820 A:60768 Proc:7
[ ] T:364.98 articles/second R:20190 A:67674 Proc:7
[ ] T:373.08 articles/second R:20384 A:73183 Proc:7
[ ] T:381.27 articles/second R:20495 A:78957 Proc:7
[ ] T:391.39 articles/second R:20960 A:85070 Proc:7
[ ] T:394.74 articles/second R:22194 A:88710 Proc:7
[ ] T:397.37 articles/second R:23525 A:92105 Proc:7
[ ] T:397.76 articles/second R:24882 A:94855 Proc:7
[ ] T:397.11 articles/second R:26138 A:97387 Proc:7
share|improve this question
    
use sentinel values instead of q.empty() e.g., for title, lines in iter(q.get, None): ... –  J.F. Sebastian Aug 9 '12 at 16:46
    
some processes might exit prematurely due to an exception or bogus q.empty(): less processes less articles per second. You could specify maxsize for the queues to avoid unlimited growth (it blocks on .put() until there is less than maxsize items). –  J.F. Sebastian Aug 9 '12 at 17:04
    
I can run 'is_alive' on the processes, and they're all still active (if I make them throw an exception, they 'die' and no longer report active). It seems like all processes are still running. I added the sentinel values, is there a particular reason this would be preferred? –  MercuryRising Aug 9 '12 at 17:17
    
Well that definitely fixed it! The sentinel values allowed the performance to increase over time (likely due to variations in article lengths). Thanks! –  MercuryRising Aug 9 '12 at 17:25
    
I don't understand the semantics of q.empty(), q.full() in presence of multiple processes/threads (how large an error could be 1, 10, 100 items?). There are alternative with clear meaning: sentinels or JoinableQueue. Queue is implemented using pipes so the processes might block with large amount of data due to buffering bugs. Try to run on the latest Python version to see if it helps. –  J.F. Sebastian Aug 9 '12 at 17:47

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