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Heres what I want to do, one of the classes is for a JFrame which contains all JButtons, I want another class to listen for the actions made on the JFrame class. See the code below:

public class Frame extends JFrame{
    //all the jcomponents in here

}

public class listener implements ActionListener{
    //listen to the actions made by the Frame class

}

Thanks for your time.

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1  
On a somewhat related note, you might want to choose different names for your classes. Java convention has classes starting with capital letters, however both Frame and Listener are classes in java already so you will have name conflicts if you are including that package. Something like Kumar's MyListener would work, or better yet name them based on what they do. –  JeffS Aug 9 '12 at 17:51

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Just add a new instance of your listener to whatever components you want to listen. Any class that implements ActionListener can be added as a listener to your components.

public class Frame extends JFrame {
    JButton testButton;

    public Frame() {
        testButton = new JButton();
        testButton.addActionListener(new listener());

        this.add(testButton);
    }
}
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1  
What about the Listener class? –  Ewen Aug 9 '12 at 17:32
    
testButton.addActionListener(new listener()); We are creating an instance of it right there. –  JeffS Aug 9 '12 at 17:33
    
@Ewen Listener is an interface not a class, when you do this.. button.addActionListener(new ActinoListener()); you are creating an anonymous class that Implements Interface ActinoListener ... SEE MY ANSWER –  Kumar Vivek Mitra Aug 9 '12 at 17:37
2  
In his code sample he clearly has a class called listener that is implementing ActionListener. You don't have to use anonymous inner classes for everything and there is nothing wrong with having an external class implementing ActionListener. You can create an instance of it fine. –  JeffS Aug 9 '12 at 17:39
    
@JeffS, thats right.... its not necessary to create an Anonymous class, we can surely create another class which implements ActionListener, and pass its instance while registering it with the button. I was clearing Ewen's doubt on Anonymous class –  Kumar Vivek Mitra Aug 9 '12 at 18:20

1. You can use Inner Class, or Anonymous Inner Class to solve this....

Eg:

Inner Class

public class Test{

 Button b = new Button();


 class MyListener implements ActionListener{

       public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {

                    // Do whatever you want to do on the button click.
      } 

   }
}

Eg:

Anonymous Inner Class

public class Test{

     Button b = new Button();

     b.addActionListener(new ActionListener(){

        public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {

                        // Do whatever you want to do on the button click.
          } 


   });

    }
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2  
Well actually thats a great idea but the purpose of doing listener on a different class is to not make the frame class too long and messy. –  Ewen Aug 9 '12 at 18:59
1  
Thanks for your code but its not what ive looked for –  Ewen Aug 15 '12 at 14:46

If you want one and the same instance of listener to listen to all of the buttons in the frame, you would have to make the actionPerformed method collect all clicks and delegate based on command:

public class listener extends ActionListener{
    public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e){
        String command = e.getActionCommand();
        if (command.equals("foo")) {
            handleFoo(e);
        } else if (command.equals("bar")) {
            handleBar(e);
        }
    }

    private void handleFoo(ActionEvent e) {...}
    private void handleBar(ActionEvent e) {...}
}

which will become easier in Java 7, where you can switch over strings! The ActionCommand of a button click will be the Text-attribute of the JButton, unless you set it otherwise

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1  
Sorry but that's not what I've asked for. –  Ewen Aug 9 '12 at 23:11

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