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I'm trying to create a Macro in Excel 2007 that will delete itself when it finishes running and close Excel. The reason I want to do this is that I am going to be sending the Workbook out to other people, and I don't want them to see security warnings about the Macros. Several versions of this Workbook will be generated, so this I don't want to manually run and remove the Macro for each one.

I've tried the following code. It runs without error, but does not actually delete the Macro. If I remove the line "ActiveWorkbook.Close SaveChanges:=True" the Macro is deleted, but this prompts the user to save the Workbook as Excel closes. Is there any way to do this without User interaction?

Dim ActiveComponent
Set ActiveComponent = ActiveWorkbook.VBProject.VBComponents("ModuleName")
ActiveWorkbook.VBProject.VBComponents.Remove (ActiveComponent)
ActiveWorkbook.Save
Application.Quit
ActiveWorkbook.Close SaveChanges:=True
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3  
Why not just move your macros to another workbook and have them operate on the workbook(s) you're sending out? – Tim Williams Aug 9 '12 at 18:27
    
Alternatively, you could have the macro create a copy of the workbook you are working in, delete the code from the copy, save, close and send it out. – Scott Holtzman Aug 9 '12 at 19:14
    
    
Save as xlsx instead of xlsm? – Brad Aug 10 '12 at 3:00
    
@TimWilliams, your answer worked perfectly for me, thanks! If you add your comment as an answer, I'll mark it as Accepted. – Hofma Dresu Aug 10 '12 at 15:08
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Why not just move your macros to another workbook and have them operate on the workbook(s) you're sending out?

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