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I am working on a simple client/server program and for now all it is supposed to do is send an object from the client to the server on connection, then send an object from the server containing a response.

My object is supposed to send a username and password. Yes, I know there are other ways of authenticating a TCP connection, but this is a test to help me get my feet wet in networking with java.

My object is written as follows:

   import java.io.Serializable;

public class AuthAccount implements Serializable{
    private static final long serialVersionUID = -8918729105550799244L;
    private String username;
    private String password;

    AuthAccount(String user, String pass){
        username = user;
        password = pass;
    }
    String username(){
        return username;
    }
    String password(){
        return password;
    }
}

Socket connection is successful, but it fails on this line (oos is ObjectOutputStream):

System.out.print("Sending login object to server...");
oos.writeObject(new AuthAccount("user", "password"));
System.out.println("Done!");

I keep receiving the error:

java.io.NotSerializableException: AuthAccount

I have tried the AuthAccount test class using char[] username = new char[30]; so as to have a fixed size object. I am more of a C++ guy, but java made sense to me for this project.

share|improve this question
    
As a side note: every object in Java has a fixed size (except for arrays). The two strings are just references. It does not change anything though. Your source seems fine, the error might be somewhere else. –  fdreger Aug 9 '12 at 18:04
    
i.imgur.com/U7sfP.jpg ! –  Tom Anderson Aug 9 '12 at 20:02
    
@fdreger All instantiations of a given class are the same size. It doesn't extend to all objects. –  EJP Aug 11 '12 at 8:27
    
@EJP In the last sentence ("I have tried [...] so as to have a fixed size object") it is clear from the context that KG6ZVP is using a mental shortcut, meaning "so as to have an object of a class that guarantees that all its instances are of the same size". In my comment I assumed the same meaning of "object". And since we are nitpicking, your statement taken out of context is also wrong: two instances of Ljava/lang/String can have different sizes. –  fdreger Aug 11 '12 at 12:21

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You must be using an old version of your build because

public class Main {
    public static void main(String... args) throws IOException, ClassNotFoundException {
        ByteArrayOutputStream baos = new ByteArrayOutputStream();
        ObjectOutputStream oos = new ObjectOutputStream(baos);
        oos.writeObject(new AuthAccount("u", "p"));
        oos.close();

        ObjectInputStream ois = new ObjectInputStream(new ByteArrayInputStream(baos.toByteArray()));
        Object aa = ois.readObject();
    }
}
 class AuthAccount implements Serializable{
    private static final long serialVersionUID = 1;
    private final String username;
    private final String password;

    AuthAccount(String user, String pass){
        username = user;
        password = pass;
    }
    String username(){
        return username;
    }
    String password(){
        return password;
    }
}

runs without error.

share|improve this answer
1  
That was the weirdest problem! I re-compiled my code and ran it, with the same error as before and re-compiled my code one more time and didn't receive said error. I think I have a problem in my development environment. –  KG6ZVP Aug 10 '12 at 5:46

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