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I have a good understanding of pros and cons of different image formats for web use. However, I'm trying to decide what format to use for a desktop application.

I have a potentially large number of high-resolution images (with no transparency) to deploy. I'm mainly weighing JPG vs. PNG, but am open to other formats. My understanding:

  • JPG is more compressed, which means smaller file size, but probably lower image quality. Because they are more compressed, they take more time to decompress.

  • PNG files are larger, but maintain image quality. Because they are less compressed, they decompress faster.

  • Both occupy the same amount of RAM once loaded and decompressed.

Seems that PNG is a better option, given that HD space (i.e. application size) is not an issue, because it will decompress and appear on-screen faster, and maintain higher image quality.

Are my assumptions generally correct? Are there any nuances I'm overlooking? Any other image file formats worth considering?

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2 Answers 2

I would go with Jpeg. The size is small compared to other formats and you could compress it in high quality mode so it would be very hard to notice any Jpeg artifacts. Regarding decompression, since most of the decompression procedure is math and CPU runs much faster than memory you will be amazed to hear that in many cases decompressing a Jpeg is faster than reading a PNG from the disk and displaying it.

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Your assumptions are roughly correct.

Because [JPG] are more compressed, they take more time to decompress.

Not exactly, a JPG supports distinct levels of compression, the time to decompress depends on the algorithm itself, which is slighly more complex than PNG. However, decompression speed is rarely an issue. And, in any case, that depends wildly on the decoder implementation.

Seems that PNG is a better option, given that HD space (i.e. application size) is not an issue is not an issue, because it will decompress and appear on-screen faster, and maintain higher image quality.

May be. PNG is definitely better if your program is going to read-modify-write the images; JPG is not advisable in this scenario -unless you use lossless JPG. If, instead, the images are read only, the difference is less important. Notice that for high resolution photographic images, the compression ratio can be quite different; and, even if you are not worried about HD space, bigger files can be slower to read because of I/O performance.

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