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I am a C# beginner and trying a new piece of code out. The following code doesn't print the values correctly:

namespace systemTypes
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
             CommonData<string>name = new CommonData<string>();
             name.Value = "abcd";
             CommonData<float>version = new CommonData<float>();
             version.Value = 2.0F;
             Console.WriteLine(
                 "generic object storing string val : {0}",
                 name.Value);
             Console.WriteLine(
                 "generic object storing float val : {0}",
                 version.Value);
         }
    }

    public class CommonData<T>
    {
        private T _data;
        public T Value
        {
            get
            {
                return this._data;
            }
            set
            {
                this._data = value;
            }
        }
    }
}

It prints blank for string value and zero for int value to the console. Do I need implement a default constructor? What am I missing here?

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I can see one issue you may have: CommonData<int> version = new CommonData<float>(); –  David B Aug 9 '12 at 19:29
1  
CommonData<int>version = new CommonData<float>(); <-- That won't compile. –  FishBasketGordo Aug 9 '12 at 19:30
1  
How is a code that does not compile supposed to print values! It won't even start. –  Olivier Jacot-Descombes Aug 9 '12 at 19:34
    
i agree , its a typing mistake, i assure that it is an float data type . now, i say, using this code displays a blank for string , and zero for float value. –  namus Aug 15 '12 at 14:36

3 Answers 3

The compiler would have told you this was wrong:

CommonData<int>version = new CommonData<float>();

for which the compiler says:

Error 1 Cannot implicitly convert type 'systemTypes.CommonData' to 'systemTypes.CommonData' some.cs 10 39 someproject

At the moment it doesn't compile, so you are running some old version that presumably had hard-coded zero. You aren't running the code you have shown.

Working code would have been:

CommonData<float>version = new CommonData<float>();

However, there are times when saying too much is asking for trouble; var would have worked fine first time:

var name = new CommonData<string>();
name.Value = "abcd";
var version = new CommonData<float>();
version.Value = 2.0F;
Console.WriteLine("generic object storing string val : {0}", name.Value);
Console.WriteLine("generic object storing float val : {0}", version.Value);

Here, var just means "compiler: you can see what is on the right - you figure out the variable type for me please". It doesn't mean "variant" or "dynamic" or anything like that.

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This is a compile time error. You are declaring the generic type of 'int' but instantiating with 'float' Corrected line is

CommonData<float> version = new CommonData<float>();
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Because you have a compilation error at this line:

CommonData<int>version = new CommonData<float>();

Specifically:

error CS0029: Cannot implicitly convert type Test.CommonData<float> to Test.CommonData<int>

error CS0031: Constant value 2 cannot be converted to a int

You may be running an older binary. Fix the compilation error and see if you're problem doesn't go away.

To fix it:

  1. Make sure your type arguments match. Pick either int or float. Or declare the variable with the var keyword on the left-hand side: var version = new CommonData<float>();

  2. Assign a literal matching the type you picked in step 1 to the Value property. If you picked int, use 2. If you picked float, use 2.0f.

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