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Have a strange problem (strange because I do not understand it)

Trying to use jQuery UI Tabs with 100% height and a vertical overflow scrollbar for the content.

This does not work - the scrollable area is bigger then the visible area resulting in the lower part of the scrollbar to be below the visible area. Looks like the scroll area is extended with the height of the list area.

The problem is only valid with 100% height (have testet this in different ways). As soon as I set a fixed height (in some way) the problem is gone???

Have after some test found out that the UI is not to blame and the problem is also valid with native list items.

My setup is this:

  • I need to use all available space (complete iframe, div, window)
  • I do not know the height of the top list.
  • I need to use the remaining space for content with vertical overflow
  • Will not use a script to modify the height (must be possible with CSS and HTML5 alone)

You can see a demonstration here:

http://jsfiddle.net/beasty/6cAat/10/

Any suggestion on how to fix it?

Thank you Benny

share|improve this question
1  
height: 100% means that the element is 100% of the height of its parent, not that it will take up 100% of the remaining space. – MrOBrian Aug 9 '12 at 20:06
    
I know that setting some hight clear the problem. But my setup is this: I need to use all available space (complete iframe, div, window) I do not know the height of the top list. I need to use the remaining space for content with overflow-y How do I do this? – Beast Aug 10 '12 at 6:06
    
The way I've done it is to position: absolute a container div with left, right and bottom set to zero and top either set to a fixed value (if there is a fixed header, for example) or a calculated value that would be recalculated on load, content change, window resize, etc. – MrOBrian Aug 10 '12 at 16:04
    
Yes I know this is possibility with added JavaScript but can not understand that this simple setup is not directly possible with CSS and HTML5 alone – Beast Aug 11 '12 at 4:51

The css property height: 100% has no effect on relatively positioned elements.

<div style="position: relative; height: 100%; border-style: solid; border-width:2px;">

    <div id="contenttab" style="position: absolute; top: 0; bottom: 0; right: 0; left: 0; overflow-y: auto;">

        Looong text

    </div>
</div>

Here's a slightly better way to do this. You'll still have to determine the height of the list above the absolutely positioned div.

share|improve this answer
    
The height property actually does have an effect in this case since its only child is absolutely positioned; without the height declaration its height effectively becomes zero (unless the overflow property is used). – Micah Henning Aug 9 '12 at 20:16
    
I know that setting some hight clear the problem. But my setup is this: I need to use all available space (complete iframe, div, window) I do not know the height of the top list. I need to use the remaining space for content with overflow-y How do I do this? – Beast Aug 10 '12 at 6:05

This is because the top-level div element has its overflow hidden. Its child div element extends beyond the height of its parent because its height is 100%. The browser calculates the height of the parent, which in this case is 643 pixels. So the child is also 643 pixels, even though it has to share the visible space with the unordered list, which is 60 pixels in height. Therefore, 60 pixels of the child div element is hidden from view.

As a solution, you could set the height of the ul to 10% and the child div to 90%. But be careful! You're using borders which aren't included in the height declaration, so you'll still lost a certain amount of the child div exactly equal to the number of pixels of border you're using. Also, if the ul ever grows, its contents could be cut from view as well. It's probably a better idea to not specify a height for the child div or the ul and instead allow the parent div to overflow-y. Otherwise it kind of seems "frame-y".

share|improve this answer
    
I know that setting some hight clear the problem. But my setup is this: I need to use all available space (complete iframe, div, window) I do not know the height of the top list. I need to use the remaining space for content with overflow-y How do I do this? – Beast Aug 10 '12 at 6:05
    
Try this: jsfiddle.net/6cAat/13 – Micah Henning Aug 10 '12 at 13:33
    
The borders are not needed in my real setup and you approch will also scroll the header list (do not like that) – Beast Aug 11 '12 at 4:52
    
You can remove the borders, but in the example the header list does not scroll. – Micah Henning Aug 13 '12 at 17:53
    
Sorry, I was referring to your suggestion to "allow the parent div to overflow-y". – Beast Aug 13 '12 at 18:55

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