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in bash, with

$ echo {1..10}
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

I can get a numbers sequence, but in some case I need

01 02 03 ... 10

how I can get this ?

and how I can get ?

001 002 ... 010 011 .. 100
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1  
Wow my first reflex when I saw the title was, what's with the dots? There's no missing numbers, it's 00, 01, 10, 11 etc. –  Blindy Aug 9 '12 at 20:28

6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This will work in any shell on a machine that has coreutils installed (thanks commenters for correcting me):

seq -w 1 10

and

seq -w 1 100
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Well, any shell that has access to seq, which is non-standard. –  William Pursell Aug 9 '12 at 20:15
    
@WilliamPursell: I'm yet to see a unix-like OS where seq ain't present. You know any? –  favoretti Aug 9 '12 at 20:24
    
seq is not part of the shell, but external tooling (eg. coreutils). –  lynxlynxlynx Aug 9 '12 at 20:27
1  
seq is not available on OS X. –  William Pursell Aug 9 '12 at 20:34
1  
@WilliamPursell: [36][22:36:27] vlazarenko@alluminium (~) > uname -a : Darwin alluminium 12.0.0 Darwin Kernel Version 12.0.0: Sun Jun 24 23:00:16 PDT 2012; root:xnu-2050.7.9~1/RELEASE_X86_64 x86_64, [37][22:36:28] vlazarenko@alluminium (~) > seq : usage: seq [-w] [-f format] [-s string] [-t string] [first [incr]] last –  favoretti Aug 9 '12 at 20:37
$ printf "%02d " {0..10}; echo
00 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 
$ printf "%03d " {0..100}; echo
000 001 002 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 011 012 013 014 015 016 017 018 019 020 021 022 023 024 025 026 027 028 029 030 031 032 033 034 035 036 037 038 039 040 041 042 043 044 045 046 047 048 049 050 051 052 053 054 055 056 057 058 059 060 061 062 063 064 065 066 067 068 069 070 071 072 073 074 075 076 077 078 079 080 081 082 083 084 085 086 087 088 089 090 091 092 093 094 095 096 097 098 099 100

Just vary the field width in the format string (2 and 3 in this case) and of course the brace expansion range. The echo is there just for cosmetic purposes, since the format string does not contain a newline itself.

printf is a shell builtin, but you likely also have a version from coreutils installed, which can be used in-place.

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Don't understand how One "%02d" in FORMAT string is applied to all printf arguments? –  dimba Aug 9 '12 at 20:30
    
I guess you're confused by the c version — think of it like printf does an internal loop over those arguments, just like the awk solution posted in other answers. –  lynxlynxlynx Aug 9 '12 at 20:37

awk only:

awk 'BEGIN { for (i=0; i<10; i++) printf("%02d ", i) }'
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+1 Finally someone without long yes chains. :) –  lynxlynxlynx Aug 9 '12 at 20:24
2  
Don't need awk: for ((i=0; i<10; i++)); do printf "%02d " $i; done -- that's valid bash. –  glenn jackman Aug 10 '12 at 0:41
printf "%02d " {1..10} ; echo

Output:

01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10

Similarly:

printf "%03d " {1..100} ; echo 

In more recent versions of bash, simply:

echo {01..10}

And:

echo {001..100}
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1  
echo {01..10} 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 –  JuanPablo Aug 9 '12 at 20:11
1  
bash 3.2.48 evaluates the expression as JuanPablo lists. –  phs Aug 9 '12 at 20:12
    
bash 4.2.037 works too –  uzsolt Aug 9 '12 at 21:32

There are so many ways to do this! My personal favorite is:

yes | grep y | sed 100q | awk '{printf( "%03d ", NR )}'; echo

Clearly, neither the sed nor the grep are necessary (the grep being far more trivial, since if you omit the sed you need to change the awk), but they contribute to the overall satisfaction of the solution! The final echo is not really necessary either, but it's always nice to have a trailing newline.

Another nice option is:

yes | nl -ba | tr ' ' 0 | sed 100q | cut -b 4-6
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The following will work in bash

echo {01..10}

**EDIT seeing the answers around me I just wanted to add this, in the case we're talking about commands that will work under any terminal

yes | head -n 100 | awk '{printf( "%03d ", NR )}'   ##for 001...100

or

yes | head -n 10 | awk '{printf( "%03d ", NR )}'    ##for 01..10
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It does not appear to work in bash 3.2.48 –  phs Aug 9 '12 at 20:13
    
$ echo {01..10} 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 –  JuanPablo Aug 9 '12 at 20:13
    
@phs Yeah I saw your comment below. it works under 4.1.2 –  Florin Stingaciu Aug 9 '12 at 20:14

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