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I am trying to implement a simple multi-dimensional Point class with templates (learning). I need two specializations Point2D and Point3D - here is what I have got so far to allow for constructors to initialize the Point directly like Point p (1, 2). Although this code compiles and works fine, what I don't like is the code repetition part in the specialization - I must be doing something wrong.

I am new to C++ / templates - any help is appreciated.

#ifndef POINT_H_
#define POINT_H_

template< typename T, int Dimensions = 2 >
class Point
{
public:
    typedef typename T value_type;

    Point() { std::fill(elements_, elements_+Dimensions, 0); }
    Point(const Point<T, Dimensions>& rhs) : elements_(rhs.elements_) {}
    ~Point() {}


    Point & operator=(const Point<T, Dimensions>& rhs) { return *this; }

    const Point operator+(const Point<T, Dimensions>& p)
    {
        Point<T, Dimensions> ret;

        for(int i = 0; i < Dimensions; i++)
        {
            ret[i] += elements_[i] + p[i];
        }

        return ret;
    }

    Point & operator+=( const Point<T, Dimensions>& p)
    {
        for(int i = 0; i < Dimensions; i++)
        {
            elements_[i] += p[i];
        }

        return *this;
    }

    Point & operator-=( const Point<T, Dimensions> & p)
    {
        for(int i = 0; i < Dimensions; i++)
        {
            elements_[i] -= p[i];
        }

        return *this;
    }

    T & operator[](const size_t index)
    {
        return elements_[index];
    }

private:
    T elements_[Dimensions];
};

template<typename T>
class Point< T, 2 >
{
public:
    Point(const T x, const T y)
    {
        elements_[0] = x;
        elements_[1] = y;
    }

    typedef typename T value_type;

    Point() { std::fill(elements_, elements_+Dimensions, 0); }
    Point(const Point<T, 2>& rhs) : elements_(rhs.elements_) {}
    ~Point() {}


    Point & operator=(const Point<T, 2>& rhs) { return *this; }

    const Point operator+(const Point<T, 2>& p)
    {
        Point<T, 2> ret;

        for(int i = 0; i < 2; i++)
        {
            ret[i] += elements_[i] + p[i];
        }

        return ret;
    }

    Point & operator+=( const Point<T, 2>& p)
    {
        for(int i = 0; i < 2; i++)
        {
            elements_[i] += p[i];
        }

        return *this;
    }

    Point & operator-=( const Point<T, 2> & p)
    {
        for(int i = 0; i < 2; i++)
        {
            elements_[i] -= p[i];
        }

        return *this;
    }

    T & operator[](const size_t index)
    {
        return elements_[index];
    }

private:
    T elements_[2];
};


template< typename T>
class Point< T, 3 >
{
public:

    Point(const T x, const T y, const T z)
    {
        elements_[0] = x;
        elements_[1] = y;
        elements_[2] = z;
    }

    typedef typename T value_type;

    Point() { std::fill(elements_, elements_+3, 0); }
    Point(const Point<T, 3>& rhs) : elements_(rhs.elements_) {}
    ~Point() {}


    Point & operator=(const Point<T, 3>& rhs) { return *this; }

    const Point operator+(const Point<T, 3>& p)
    {
        Point<T, 3> ret;

        for(int i = 0; i < 3; i++)
        {
            ret[i] += elements_[i] + p[i];
        }

        return ret;
    }

    Point & operator+=( const Point<T, 3>& p)
    {
        for(int i = 0; i < 3; i++)
        {
            elements_[i] += p[i];
        }

        return *this;
    }

    Point & operator-=( const Point<T, 3> & p)
    {
        for(int i = 0; i < 3; i++)
        {
            elements_[i] -= p[i];
        }

        return *this;
    }

    T & operator[](const size_t index)
    {
        return elements_[index];
    }

private:
    T elements_[3];
};

typedef Point< int, 2 > Point2Di;
typedef Point< int, 3 > Point3Di;


#endif //POINT_H_
share|improve this question
    
I don't see any reason that you need to specialize this class at all. It should all work with no specialization (aside from maybe a few minor tweaks). –  Chad Aug 9 '12 at 20:34
1  
Looks to me like you could put a lot of that repeated code into a common base class that your main class and it's specializations derive from. –  jahhaj Aug 9 '12 at 20:36
    
@Chad, The only reason I want to specialize this is to add the constructor Point<T, 2>(T x, T y) as a convenience. –  user1588625 Aug 9 '12 at 20:42
    
@jahhaj, As far as my current understanding goes, inheritence doesn't work well with templates. Can you suggest a sample code for one of the functions? –  user1588625 Aug 9 '12 at 20:44
    
@user1588625 Inheritance works perfectly fine with templates. –  Captain Obvlious Aug 9 '12 at 21:00

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can just – simply – provide both a 2D and a 3D constructor in the main template.

There is no need to dally with base classes and other Rube Goldberg solutions here, because there is no problem to be solved: we're in template-land, where anything unused is simply unused.

Example:

#ifndef POINT_H_
#define POINT_H_

#include <array>            // std::array

#define STATIC_ASSERT( e ) static_assert( e, "!(" #e ")" )

template< typename T, int nDimensions = 2 >
class Point
{
private:
    std::array< T, nDimensions > elements_;

public:
    typedef T ValueType;

    T& operator[]( int const i )
    {
        return elements_[i];
    }

    T const& operator[]( int const i ) const
    {
        return elements_[i];
    }

    void operator+=( Point const& other )
    {
        for( int i = 0; i < nDimensions; ++i )
        {
            elements_[i] += other.elements_[i];
        }
    }

    void operator-=( Point const& other )
    {
        for( int i = 0; i < nDimensions; ++i )
        {
            elements_[i] -= other.elements_[i];
        }
    }

    friend Point operator+( Point const& a, Point const& b )
    {
        Point ret( a );

        ret += b;
        return ret;
    }

    friend Point operator-( Point const&a, Point const& b )
    {
        Point ret( a );

        ret -= b;
        return ret;
    }

    Point(): elements_() {}

    Point( int x, int y )
    {
        STATIC_ASSERT( nDimensions == 2 );
        elements_[0] = x;
        elements_[1] = y;
    }

    Point( int x, int y, int z )
    {
        STATIC_ASSERT( nDimensions == 3 );
        elements_[0] = x;
        elements_[1] = y;
        elements_[2] = z;
    }
};

typedef Point< int, 2 > Point2D;
typedef Point< int, 3 > Point3D;

#endif //POINT_H_

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

wostream& operator<<( wostream& stream, Point3D const& point )
{
    return (stream << "(" << point[0] << ", " << point[1] << ", " << point[2] << ")");
}

int main()
{
    wcout << "starting" << endl;
    Point3D a( 1, 2, 3 );
    Point3D b( 4, 5, 6 );

    a += b;
    wcout << a << endl;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! I would just use BOOST_STATIC_ASSERT_MSG for a better error message. –  user1588625 Aug 9 '12 at 21:12
    
A side question: Any reason why you defined operator+= and operator-= as returning void instead of Point & and returning *this ? –  user1588625 Aug 9 '12 at 21:24
    
@user1588625: I just see no reason to have more and possible less efficient code in order to support expressions with multiple side effects, which is ungood in modern software engineering. Support for multiple side effects made sense in C in the 1970's, when the programmer hand-crafted optimizations. Today that's the compiler's job, and our job is to write code that is clear and easy to understand for humans. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Aug 9 '12 at 21:31
    
Nice idea to use the static assert, but this doesn't scale well to higher dimensions. I wonder if it is possible to implement some kind of variadic constructor solution. –  juanchopanza Aug 11 '12 at 11:54
    
I added a variadic template constructor example to my answer. –  juanchopanza Aug 11 '12 at 13:50

Like jahhaj says, move the common code into a base class template and inherit from it:

template<typename T, int Dimensions>
class PointBase {
    ...  // all existing code from Point
};

template<typename T, int Dimensions = 2>
class Point: public PointBase<T, Dimensions> {
    // empty
};

template<typename T>
class Point<T, 2>: public PointBase<T, 2> {
public:
    Point(T x, T y): PointBase<T, 2>() { // convenience constructor
       (*this)[0] = x;
       (*this)[1] = y;
    }
};

As an aside, C++11 variadic templates and initializer lists will remove any need to create convenience constructors by hand.

share|improve this answer

I would suggest having a class template similar to what you have shown:

template< typename T, int Dimensions>
class Point {
};

and then further Point2D and Point3D class templates that inherit from that:

template <typename T>
class Point2D : public Point<T,2>{
  // add X,Y constructor
};

template <typename T>
class Point3D : public Point<T,3>{
  // add X,Y, Z constructor
};

Another option, if you have C++11, is to add a variadic template constructor to the generic Point class template. This avoids inheritance entirely and is general for any number of dimensions:

template< typename T, unsigned int N>
class Point {
  template <typename ... Args>
  Point(const Args& ... args) : elements_{args...} {}
};

This would allow the following:

Point<int, 3> p3a(1,2,3); // OK, array values set to 1, 2, 3
Point<int, 3> p3b(1,2); // OK, array values set to 1, 2, 0
Point<int, 3> p3c(1,2,3,4); // compiler error! 
Point<double, 10> p10a(1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10); // OK
share|improve this answer
    
No need to make elements_ protected is there? operator[] has been provided to allow full access to the underlying storage in the base class. –  Monroe Thomas Aug 9 '12 at 20:49
    
This works, brilliant! –  user1588625 Aug 9 '12 at 20:51
    
@MonroeThomas, agreed! –  user1588625 Aug 9 '12 at 20:52
    
@user1588625 I added an example that uses a variadic template constructor. This does away with the inheritance and is general for any number of dimensions. –  juanchopanza Aug 11 '12 at 13:48

Since you want to change count of input arguments of your constructor you have 2 ways:
1) Move all implementation to a base class and drive you class from it and then specialize drived class
2) Use a preprocessor command to repeat your constructor( for example with BOOST_PP_REPEAT ) and then disable invalid constructors using templates( tr1::disable_if or boost::disabled_if ).

First technic is very simple but for second one there is lot of documentation and help about BOOST_PP_REPEAT and 'disable_if`, if they do not help you let me know to send you a complete working code

share|improve this answer

I tried out Luchian's answer, but it doesn't seem to work for providing new constructors in the specialization.

You can, however, use derivation to help provide types with different constructors. Unfortunately, with this technique you have to redefine all of the constructors you want to expose.

As an aside, note that you don't need to repeat template parameters when refering to the current type within the definition of the templated type itself.

#ifndef POINT_H_ 
#define POINT_H_ 

template< typename T, int Dimensions = 2 > 
class Point 
{ 
public: 
    typedef typename T value_type; 

    Point() { std::fill(elements_, elements_+Dimensions, 0); } 
    Point(const Point& rhs) : elements_(rhs.elements_) {} 
    virtual ~Point() {} 


    Point & operator=(const Point& rhs) { return *this; } 

    Point operator+(const Point& p) 
    { 
        Point<T, Dimensions> ret; 

        for(int i = 0; i < Dimensions; i++) 
        { 
            ret[i] += elements_[i] + p[i]; 
        } 

        return ret; 
    } 

    Point & operator+=( const Point& p) 
    { 
        for(int i = 0; i < Dimensions; i++) 
        { 
            elements_[i] += p[i]; 
        } 

        return *this; 
    } 

    Point & operator-=( const Point& p) 
    { 
        for(int i = 0; i < Dimensions; i++) 
        { 
            elements_[i] -= p[i]; 
        } 

        return *this; 
    } 

    T & operator[](const size_t index) 
    { 
        return elements_[index]; 
    } 

private: 
    T elements_[Dimensions]; 
}; 


template<typename T>
class Point2D : public Point<T, 2>
{
public:

    Point2D()
    {
    }

    Point2D(const Point2D& rhs) : Point<T, 2>(rhs) 
    {
    }

    Point2D(const T x, const T y) 
    { 
        (*this)[0] = x; 
        (*this)[1] = y;
    }
};

template<typename T>
class Point3D : public Point<T, 3>
{
public:

    Point3D()
    {
    }

    Point3D(const Point3D& rhs) : Point<T, 3>(rhs) 
    {
    }

    Point3D(const T x, const T y, const T z) 
    { 
        (*this)[0] = x; 
        (*this)[1] = y;
        (*this)[2] = z;
    }
};


typedef Point2D< int > Point2Di; 
typedef Point3D< int > Point3Di; 



#endif //POINT_H_ 

As a point of pedantry, You may wish to add a const index accessor in the base class as well:

    const T & operator[](const size_t index) const
    { 
        return elements_[index]; 
    } 
share|improve this answer

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