Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am using a regular expression to extract key-value pairs from arbitrarily long input strings and have run into a case in which, for a long string with repetitive patterns, it causes a stack overflow.

The KV-parsing code looks something like this:

public static void parse(String input)
{
    String KV_REGEX = "((?:\"[^\"^ ]*\"|[^=,^ ])*) *= *((?:\"[^\"]*\"|[^=,^\\)^ ])*)";
    Pattern KV_PATTERN = Pattern.compile(KV_REGEX);

    Matcher matcher = KV_PATTERN.matcher(input);

    System.out.println("\nMatcher groups discovered:");

    while (matcher.find())
    {
        System.out.println(matcher.group(1) + ", " + matcher.group(2));
    }
}

Some fictitious examples of output:

    String input1 = "2012-08-09 09:10:25,521 INFO com.a.package.SomeClass - Everything working fine {name=CentOS, family=Linux, category=OS, version=2.6.x}";
    String input2 = "2012-08-09 blah blah 09:12:38,462 Log for the main thread, PID=5872, version=\"7.1.8.x\", build=1234567, other=done";

Calling parse(input1) produces:

{name, CentOS
family, Linux
category, OS
version, 2.6.x}

Calling parse(input2) produces:

PID, 5872
version, "7.1.8.x"
build, 1234567
other, done

This is fine (even with a bit of string processing required for the first case). However, when trying to parse a very long (over 1,000 characters long) classpath string, the aforementioned class overflow occurs, with the following exception (start):

Exception in thread "main" java.lang.StackOverflowError
    at java.util.regex.Pattern$BitClass.isSatisfiedBy(Pattern.java:2927)
    at java.util.regex.Pattern$8.isSatisfiedBy(Pattern.java:4783)
    at java.util.regex.Pattern$8.isSatisfiedBy(Pattern.java:4783)
    at java.util.regex.Pattern$8.isSatisfiedBy(Pattern.java:4783)
    at java.util.regex.Pattern$8.isSatisfiedBy(Pattern.java:4783)
    at java.util.regex.Pattern$CharProperty.match(Pattern.java:3345)
    ...

The string is too long to put here, but it has the following, easily reproducible and repetitive structure:

java.class.path=/opt/files/any:/opt/files/any:/opt/files/any:/opt/files/any

Anyone who wants to reproduce the issue just needs to append :/opt/files/any a few dozen times to the above string. After creating a string with about 90 copies of ":/opt/files/any" present in the classpath string, the stack overflow occurs.

Is there a generic way that the above KV_REGEX string could be modified, so that the issue does not occur and the same results are produced?

I explicitly put generic above, as opposed to hacks that (for instance) check for a maximum string length before parsing.

The most gross fix I could come up with, a true anti-pattern, is

public void safeParse(String input)
{
    try
    {
        parse(input);
    }
    catch (StackOverflowError e) // Or even Throwable!
    {
        parse(input.substring(0, MAX_LENGTH));
    }
}

Funnily enough, it works in a few runs I tried it, but it is not something tasteful enough to recommend. :-)

share|improve this question
2  
Congratulations on breaking the limits. –  Nambari Aug 9 '12 at 20:32
1  
What is this part supposed to match? It doesn't look correct at all. [^=,^\\)^ ]. –  Keppil Aug 9 '12 at 20:36
1  
This is a nice demonstration to a Java guy why there's folks out there who can't stand Perl. –  Marko Topolnik Aug 9 '12 at 20:48
1  
You should have sent this to Jeff Atwood a long time ago. It would have saved him some time. :) –  Almo Aug 9 '12 at 20:49
1  
@PNS: That could be simplified as [^=) ] (which gives you a nice little smiley as a bonus). Your example also stops at ^. –  Keppil Aug 9 '12 at 20:56

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your regex looks overly complicated, for example I think you haven't quite understood how character classes work. This works better for me, I can't make it overflow anymore:

public static void parse(String input) {
    String KV_REGEX = "(\"[^\" ]*\"|[^{=, ]*) *= *(\"[^\"]*\"|[^=,) }]*)";
    Pattern KV_PATTERN = Pattern.compile(KV_REGEX);

    Matcher matcher = KV_PATTERN.matcher(input);

    System.out.println("\nMatcher groups discovered:");

    while (matcher.find()) {
        System.out.println(matcher.group(1) + ", " + matcher.group(2));
    }
}

To break down the regex, this will match:

(\"[^\" ]*\"|[^{=, ]*): Anything enclosed with "s, or any number of non-{=, characters

*= *: zero to any number of spaces, followed by =, followed by zero to any number of spaces

(\"[^\"]*\"|[^=,) }]*): Anything enclosed with "s, or any number of non-=,) } characters

share|improve this answer
    
This indeed looks better. I will try it with my much more complex cases first chance. Thanks! :-) –  PNS Aug 9 '12 at 21:07

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.