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I've been using the repository pattern with the entity framework model first setup. In my base repository class I have the typical CRUD methods. Since the EF tracks changes to objects why would I need an Update CRUD method? I can simply query the repository make the changes to the object and commit without calling Update. EF will automatically update any objects changed with the Modified object state. Thanks

public class BaseRepository<T> : IRepository<T> where T : class
{
  private ObjectSet<T> _set;
  private readonly IDatabaseFactor _databaseFactory;

  protected MyDataContext DataContext
  {
    get{ return _databaseFactory.DataContext;}
  }


  public BaseRepository(IDatabaseFactory dbFactory)
  {
    _databaseFactory = dbFactory;
        _set = _databaseFactory.DataContext.CreateOjbectSet<T>();
  }

  public virtual IQueryable<T> GetQuery()
  {
    return _set;
  }

  public virtual void Insert(T entity)
  {
    _set.AddObject(entity);
  }

  public virtual void Delete(T entity)
  {
    _set.DeleteObject(entity);
  }

  public virtual void Update(T entity)
  {
    _context.ObjectStateManager.ChangeObjectState(entity, EntityState.Modified);
  }
}
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1 Answer 1

A repository should be abstract from it's implementation. Meaning that you could have any implementation underneath the interface per say. The whole point of having this separation is to make it so you could completely re-write BaseRepository without changing any code that uses it (because your code that uses it should be based on IRepository

One example would be Entity Framework vs. WCF Data Services. They both use EF underneath and LINQ, but WCF Data Services needs to call an Update method on the data context to build the URL to submit the data.

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