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While working on a project today I ran into this odd behavior in .NET.

I'm grabbing a list of file names and adding them to an object. However I need to filter the incoming names against a known list of "bad" names which led me to do this. (I'm by no means an advanced C# coder, still just learning it.) However, because it causes the aspnet_wp.exe process to run at 100% indefinitely, I assume that I'm doing something wrong with the language.

Here's my code for reference:

List<string> localFiles = new List<string>(); 
// I was worried the object was causing the issue so dumbed it down to this with no changed.

string path = "//<file share>/<dir>/"; 
// As I commented below yes, it's slow when it works but it's clearly not working when using the if();

List<string> omitNames = new List<string>();
omitNames.Add("Thumbs.db"); 
// This is the only item in the list when it breaks also.

FileInfo[] localFileList = new DirectoryInfo(path).GetFiles();
foreach ( FileInfo item in localFileList )
{
    if(!omitNames.Contains(item.Name))
    {
        localFiles.Add(path + itemName);
    }
}

Can anyone explain why this code runs as an infinite loop? It looks like it really shouldn't. Also, I realize that using a List may not be the best approach. Is there another way to implement this cleanly?

Commenting out the if(!){} for omitNames allows the code to run properly. (Though obviously the results are not filtered.)

UPDATE: It was requested to put this in a console app which you'll find below. However it works perfectly. Another thing is that someone suggested that I try to simply compare it against a string. But the exact same thing happens if it's changed to this:

if(item.Name != "Thumbs.db")
{
    localFiles.Add(path + itemName);
}

Console App (which works):

using System;
using System.IO;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace LoopKiller
{
class Program
{

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {

        List<string> omitNames = new List<string>();
        List<string> localFiles = new List<string>();

        omitNames.Add("Thumbs.db");

        FileInfo[] localFileList = new DirectoryInfo("c:/test/").GetFiles();

        foreach (FileInfo item in localFileList)
        {
            if (!omitNames.Contains(item.Name))
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Adding " + item.Name + " to localFiles.");
                localFiles.Add(item.Name);
                Console.WriteLine("Item added to localFiles.");
            }
        }

        foreach (string item in localFiles)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(item);
        }

        Console.ReadLine();

    }
}
}
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How many entries are in the directory? –  Oded Aug 9 '12 at 20:49
2  
Can you change this into a short but complete program (e.g. a console app) which demonstrates the problem? –  Jon Skeet Aug 9 '12 at 20:51
    
When you debug, does it add at least one item to the list? Or does it crash immediately? –  Hanlet Escaño Aug 9 '12 at 20:54
1  
Where are localFiles and itemName defined? Could you please post more of your code? –  Jon Senchyna Aug 9 '12 at 20:55
1  
You might consider use a HashSet for your omitNames. It's quite fast. –  Holger Brandt Aug 9 '12 at 20:57

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Is this any quicker?

foreach (string item in Directory.GetFiles("c:/test/", "*.*").Select(Path.GetFileName())
    {
        if (!omitNames.Contains(item))
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Adding " + item.Name + " to localFiles.");
            localFiles.Add(item.Name);
            Console.WriteLine("Item added to localFiles.");
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Not sure if it's faster but this does actually work against the if statement! –  siva.k Aug 9 '12 at 21:32

Try Directory.EnumerateFiles. If you only need the filename as a string then why get the entire FileInfo? And I agree with putting it in a hashset.

Directory.EnumerateFiles

Still would not help if the problem is with the !omitNames.Contains(item.Name). Something strange is going on there as that should be a very very fast call.

This runs in 2 milliseconds against a directory of 161 files and properly skips the two.

public void testFileFilter()
    {
        string path = @"c:\temp\";
        int pathLen = path.Length;
        string[] badNames = { "1692.pdf", "readme.htm" };
        List<string> goodNames = new List<string>();
        string fn;
        System.Diagnostics.Stopwatch sw = new System.Diagnostics.Stopwatch();
        sw.Start();
        foreach(String fp in System.IO.Directory.EnumerateFiles(path))
        {
            //System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine(fp);
            fn = fp.Substring(pathLen);
            //System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine(fn);
            if(badNames.Contains(fn))
            {
                //fn = fp.Substring(pathLen);
            }
            else
            {
                goodNames.Add(fn);
            }
        }
        sw.Stop();
        System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine(sw.ElapsedMilliseconds.ToString());
        System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine(goodNames.Count());
    }    
share|improve this answer
    
To make a bizarre situation stranger this actually works with the if(), though it's returning the absolute file path in the name which I can't use, it has to be just the name. –  siva.k Aug 9 '12 at 21:28
    
Since you know the length of the path you can easily and quickly strip that off. –  Blam Aug 9 '12 at 21:30
    
Use Path.GetFileName() to get only filename from path –  Ankush Aug 9 '12 at 21:31
    
Merge my answer with this one adding th select on the end and you should end up with just the filenames. –  bUKaneer Aug 9 '12 at 21:31
    
@Ankush Since it is a string I don't think that would work. –  Blam Aug 9 '12 at 21:33

Try the following:

List<string> localFiles = new List<string>();
// I was worried the object was causing the issue so dumbed it down to this with no changed.

string path = "//<file share>/<dir>/";
// As I commented below yes, it's slow when it works but it's clearly not working when using the if();

List<string> omitNames = new List<string>();
omitNames.Add("Thumbs.db");
// This is the only item in the list when it breaks also.

localFiles = (from files in new DirectoryInfo(path).GetFiles() where !omitNames.Contains(files.Name) select path + files.Name).ToList<string>();

As for why you are having the issue, I do not know. You could try putting a break point in the loop and debugging. I find that debugging makes most problems clear. For example, is locking on the getting of the file info.

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