Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How will you efficiently count number of occurrences of 0's in the decimal representation of integers from 1 to N?

e.g. The number of 0's from 1 to 105 is 16. How?

10,20,30,40,50,60,70,80,90,100,101,102,103,104,105    

Count the number of 0's & you will find it 16.

Obviously, a brute force approach won't be appreciated. You have to come up with an approach which doesn't depend on "How many numbers fall between 1 to N". Can we just do by seeing some kind of pattern?

Cannot we extend the logic compiled here to work for this problem?

share|improve this question
4  
I thought you weren't suppose to leak those questions after an interview ;) –  Mateusz Dymczyk Aug 9 '12 at 21:13
    
It's clearly proportional to n^2, so just do it brute force up to 10k or 100k to derive a constant and you're done. –  Puppy Aug 9 '12 at 21:14
    
@DeadMG, it is more likely in the order of N log N I'd say. –  Jens Gustedt Aug 9 '12 at 21:18
2  
I love these sorts of questions. Chance of a practical application of the algorithm outside the classroom 0.00000000000000000000000000001%. –  Tony Hopkinson Aug 9 '12 at 21:40
1  
To make a distribution of digits in a range, it helps to count them. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Benford's_law –  Alex Reynolds Aug 9 '12 at 22:18

5 Answers 5

up vote 14 down vote accepted

Updated Answer

My original answer was simple to understand but tricky to code. Here's something that is simpler to code. It's a straight-forward non-recursive solution that works by counting the number of ways zeros can appear in each position.

For example:

x <= 1234. How many numbers are there of the following form?

x = ??0?

There are 12 possibilities for the "hundreds or more" (1,2, ..., 12). Then there must be a zero. Then there are 10 possibilities for the last digit. This gives 12 * 10 = 120 numbers containing a 0 at the third digit.

The solution for the range (1 to 1234) is therefore:

  • ?0??: 1 * 100 = 100
  • ??0?: 12 * 10 = 120
  • ???0: 123
  • Total = 343

But an exception is if n contains a zero digit. Consider the following case:

x <= 12034. How many numbers are there of the following form?

x = ??0??

We have 12 ways to pick the "thousands or more". For 1, 2, ... 11 we can choose any two last digits (giving 11 * 100 possibilities). But if we start with 12 we can only choose a number between 00 and 34 for the last two digits. So we get 11 * 100 + 35 possibilities altogether.


Here's an implementation of this algorithm (written in Python, but in a way that should be easy to port to C):

def countZeros(n):
    result = 0
    i = 1

    while True:
        b, c = divmod(n, i)
        a, b = divmod(b, 10)

        if a == 0:
            return result

        if b == 0:
            result += (a - 1) * i + c + 1
        else:
            result += a * i

        i *= 10
share|improve this answer
2  
For 1 to 999, your "special handling for the end condition" covers 90% of the range (100 to 999). This is not a very good answer... –  Nemo Aug 9 '12 at 21:19
1  
@Nemo, I think you misinterpreted that part. The rule is to split the number into ranges with equal numbers of digits, so [1,999] becomes ([1,9],[10,99],[100,999]), and then for each segment you do (high-low)*(length-1)/10, and add them together. The "special handling for the end condition" would be if instead of [1,999] we had something like [1,1234], where [1000,1234] doesn't fit in the pattern. It's only that last part that needs special handling. –  Kevin Aug 9 '12 at 21:31
1  
@Kevin: Yes, I was thinking (1,666) or something, but I decided to go for broke and overreached. –  Nemo Aug 9 '12 at 21:40
1  
@Mark: OK, so code it up so we can compare it to the other solutions :-) –  Nemo Aug 9 '12 at 21:53
2  
Now that you have provided code and debugged it, I am removing my downvote. I still think the recursive formulation is simpler, but I agree this works. P.S. @drewk's "expectations" are perhaps better called "giving the correct answer" –  Nemo Aug 10 '12 at 1:13
class FindZero{

    public int findZero(int lastNumber){

        int count=1,k;
        if(lastNumber<10)
            return 0;
        else if(lastNumber==10)
            return 1;
        else{

            for(int i=11;i<=lastNumber;i++){
                k=i;
                while(k>0){

                    if(k%10==0)
                        count++;
                        k=k/10;
                }
            }
            return count;
        }
    }
    public static void main(String args[]){
        FindZero obj = new FindZero();
        System.out.println(obj.findZero(1234));
    }
}
share|improve this answer

I would suggest adapting this algorithm from base 2 to base 10:

Number of 1s in the two's complement binary representations of integers in a range

The resulting algorithm is O(log N).

The approach is to write a simple recursive function count(n) that counts the zeroes from 1 to n.

The key observation is that if N ends in 9, e.g.:

123456789

You can put the numbers from 0 to N into 10 equal-sized groups. Group 0 is the numbers ending in 0. Group 1 is the numbers ending in 1. Group 2 is the numbers ending in 2. And so on, all the way through group 9 which is all the numbers ending in 9.

Each group except group 0 contributes count(N/10) zero digits to the total because none of them end in zero. Group 0 contributes count(N/10) (which counts all digits but the last) plus N/10 (which counts the zeroes from the final digits).

Since we are going from 1 to N instead of 0 to N, this logic breaks down for single-digit N, so we just handle that as a special case.

[update]

What the heck, let's generalize and define count(n, d) as how many times the digit d appears among the numbers from 1 to n.

/* Count how many d's occur in a single n */
unsigned
popcount(unsigned n, unsigned d) {
  int result = 0;
  while (n != 0) {
    result += ((n%10) == d);
    n /= 10;
  }
  return result;
}

/* Compute how many d's occur all numbers from 1 to n */
unsigned
count(unsigned n, unsigned d) {
  /* Special case single-digit n */
  if (n < 10) return (d > 0 && n >= d);

  /* If n does not end in 9, recurse until it does */
  if ((n % 10) != 9) return popcount(n, d) + count(n-1, d);

  return 10*count(n/10, d) + (n/10) + (d > 0);
}

The ugliness for the case n < 10 again comes from the range being 1 to n instead of 0 to n... For any single-digit n greater than or equal to d, the count is 1 except when d is zero.

Converting this solution to a non-recursive loop is (a) trivial, (b) unnecessary, and (c) left as an exercise for the reader.

[Update 2]

The final (d > 0) term also comes from the range being 1 to n instead of 0 to n. When n ends in 9, how many numbers between 1 and n inclusive have final digit d? Well, when d is zero, the answer is n/10; when d is non-zero, it is one more than that, since it includes the value d itself.

For example, if n is 19 and d is 0, there is only one smaller number ending in 0 (i.e. 10). But if n is 19 and d is 2, there are two smaller numbers ending in 2 (i.e. 2 and 12).

Thanks to @Chan for pointing out this bug in the comments; I have fixed it in the code.

share|improve this answer
    
+1: This is very straightforward and correct. –  dawg Aug 10 '12 at 5:34
    
@Nemo, I posted a solution which I believe is something similar to what you suggested. I'm struggling with generalizing my solution. Can you please help me with it ? Thanks –  brainydexter Aug 10 '12 at 21:14
    
@Nemo: Have you tested your solution? For n = 20 with d = 2, there are 3 2's (2, 12, 20), but your solution yielded only 2. –  Chan Sep 19 '13 at 2:32
    
@Chan: Indeed I had a bug whenever d is non-zero. Fixed; thanks. –  Nemo Sep 19 '13 at 6:15
    
@Nemo: You're welcome ;) –  Chan Sep 19 '13 at 17:41

The way I approached this problem:

numbers can be in the range 1 to N:

So, I broke this into ranges like this:

Rangle      : #Digits   :   #Zeros
1   -   9   :   1       :   0
10  -   99  :   2       :   9 (number of all the possible digits when zero is at units place=> _0 ie, 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9
100 -   199 :   3       :   20 => 10 (#digits when zero is at units place) + 10 (#digits when zero is at tens place)
200 -   276 :   3       :   18 => 8 (#digits when zero is at units place) + 10 (#digits when zero is at tens place)
300 -   308 :   3       :   10 => 1 (#digits when zero is at units place) + 9 (#digits when zero is at tens place)
1000-   1008:   4       :   19 => 1 + 9 + 9

Now for any given range 1 - N, I want to be able to break the number into these ranges and use the above logic to compute the number of zeros.

Test run:

for a given number N:

- compute number of digits: len
- if len = 1 : d1: return 0
- len = 2: d2_temp: count # of digits that can possibly occur when 0 is at unit's place 
            : for e.g. 76: so numbers can be between 10 - 76: (7 - 1) + 1 = 7
         : d2: sum(d2_temp, d1)
- len = 3: return d3 : sum(d3_temp, d2)
         : compute d3_temp: 
         : for e.g. n = 308 : get digit at 10^(len-1) : loopMax 3
         : d3_temp1: count number of zeros for this loop: 1 * 100 to (loopMax -1) * 100 : (loopMax-1) * 20
         : d3_temp2: for n count (#digits when zero is at units place) + (#digits when zero is at tens place)
         : d3_temp = d3_temp1 + d3_temp2

Lets try to generalise:

99 : sum( , )
    : d3_temp: 
    : loopMax: n = 99 : n/(10^1) : 9
    : d3_temp1: 8 : (9-1) * (10*(len-1)) : (loopMax - 1) * 10 * (len-1)
    : d3_temp2: 1 : for len, count #0s in range (loopMax * 10 * (len-1)) to n : count(90, 99)
    : d3_temp = 8 + 1
    : sum(9, 0)
    : 9

I'm having some trouble proceeding from here, but this would work.

share|improve this answer
    
@Nemo: I think this is similar to what you suggested. Can you please help me come up with generalising this to make a function out of it ? –  brainydexter Aug 10 '12 at 21:11

Let Z(n) = #zero digits in numbers 0 <= k < n. Obviously, Z(0) = 0.

If n = 10*k + r, 0 <= r <= 9, all 10*k numbers 10*j + s, 0 <= j < k, 0 <= s <= 9 are in the range, each tenth last digit is 0, so that's k zeros, and each prefix j (all but the last digit) occurs ten times, but we mustn't count 0, so the number of zeros in the prefixes is 10*(Z(k)-1).

The number of zeros in the r numbers 10*k, ..., 10*k + (r-1) is r*number of zeros in k + (r > 0 ? 1 : 0).

So we have an O(log n) algorithm for computing Z(n)

unsigned long long Z(unsigned long long n)
{
    if (n == 0) {
        return 0;
    }
    if (n <= 10) {
        return 1;
    }
    unsigned long long k = n/10, r = n%10;
    unsigned long long zeros = k + 10*(Z(k)-1);
    if (r > 0) {
        zeros += r*zeroCount(k) + 1;
    }
    return zeros;
}

unsigned zeroCount(unsigned long long k)
{
    unsigned zeros = 0;
    while(k) {
        zeros += (k % 10) == 0;
        k /= 10;
    }
    return zeros;
}

To compute the number for an arbitrary range,

unsigned long long zeros_in_range(unsigned long long low, unsigned long long high)
{
    return Z(high+1) - Z(low); // beware of overflow if high is ULLONG_MAX
}
share|improve this answer
    
your function Z(105) is 26, Incorrect. –  BLUEPIXY Aug 10 '12 at 7:01
    
@BLUEPIXY Forgot to subtract the 0-prefixes, thanks for the heads-up. –  Daniel Fischer Aug 10 '12 at 11:19
    
@BLUEPIXY No, 344 is correct, Prelude> length . filter (== '0') $ [0 .. 1233] >>= show gives 344. Z(n) counts the zeros in 0, 1, ..., n-1, so it must be at least 1 for all n > 0. –  Daniel Fischer Aug 10 '12 at 11:45
    
It is starting from 0. All right. –  BLUEPIXY Aug 10 '12 at 11:57

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.