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I am developing a java web application and I am running it on a Tomcat 7 server. I am checking the size of the memory by calling:

System.out.println("Total memory is: " + Runtime.getRuntime().totalMemory());

What I am noticing that the size is changing, when the size of my data getting larger the Runtime.getRuntime().totalMemory() get larger as well.

1- Is the JVM trying to be larger than the size of the application data?

2- Is there any limit for the JVM size, other than the RAM memory size?

3- A third question not very related to the two above: what is the size of a running Tomcat 7 server application? Actually I have a small RAM in my server (Amazon cloud server, free tire, 600 MB RAM), And I am noticing that JAVA occupies about 52% of the memory without deploying any web application.

Excuse me for my very basic questions, I am not familiar with web servers and web applications.

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The object heap dynamically grows and shrinks as the garbage collector does work. :-) –  oldrinb Aug 9 '12 at 21:36
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Controlling the minimum and maximum heap sizes is described in this post. By default I believe the heap will continue to grow and the GC will eventually kick in to recover eligible objects. If your application has a memory leak you will eventually get an OutOfMemory exception based on the limits of your server set up –  Brad Aug 9 '12 at 21:41

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Is there any limit for the JVM size, other than the RAM memory size?

Yes, the limit set by you.

-Xmx for maximum heap size and -Xms for initial heap size

The JVM runs virtually. If you allocate more memory than available on your machine it will be swapped out.

what is the size of a running Tomcat 7 server application?

Haven't you answered that question yourself? It's 52% of your memory. In general you can specify for your Tomcat the memory max. and min. size as well. After all it's just another JVM.

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