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I have the following JSON:

{"data":[{"id":1,"client_id":1},{"id":2,"client_id":1}]}

I'm trying to do a for...in but something is not going well.

Look at my code:

for (post in data) {
    console.log(post.client_id); //return undefined
}

But if I do this:

for (i=0 ; i<data.length; i++) {
    console.log(data[i].client_id); //return the correct value
}

Why can't I iterate with for..in in this case?

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

First off, you should NEVER iterate arrays with for/in. That structure iterates properties of the object. You will get all the array elements, but you may also get other iterable properties of the object too.

Arrays should always be iterated with a traditional for loop as in:

for (var i = 0; i < arr.length; i++).

Second off, you have to make sure you're following your own data structure properly. You have this:

var item = {"data":[{"id":1,"client_id":1},{"id":2,"client_id":1}]};

which spread out some more looks like this:

var item = {
    "data":[
        {"id":1,"client_id":1},
        {"id":2,"client_id":1}
     ]
};

So, your JSON is an object. That object has one property in it called data and that one property's value is an array, which contains objects. You would get the first item in the array with this:

item.data[0]

Or the properties on that object with this:

item.data[0].id
item.data[0].client_id

You would iterate all the items in that array like this:

for (var i = 0; i < item.data.length; i++) {
    // access each object in the array
    item.data[i].id
    item.data[i].client_id
}
share|improve this answer

The value of the "data" property is an array. You need:

for (var i = 0; i < json.data.length; ++i)
  console.log(json.data[i].client_id);

That's assuming that the JSON has been parsed and stored in a variable called "json". If it's actually called "data", then it'd be "data.data" instead of "json.data".

You really should not use for ... in loops for real arrays. It's a bad habit for a variety of reasons. Use a numeric index or something like the .forEach() facilities available in newer browsers.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 I also think in this example, for this reason, it's safer to stick with a good old for (var i = 0; i < x; i++) – Richard Aug 9 '12 at 22:02
    
it's a bad habit for what reason? Could you say some or suggest an article? Thankssss – rizidoro Aug 9 '12 at 22:07
1  
Some libraries extend the Array prototype object, and your loop will stumble into random other properties you don't expect. That's why for ... in is a bad idea. For real numerically-index arrays, always use numeric index variables and plain old for loops. – Pointy Aug 9 '12 at 22:13

it should be like this:

for (var post in data) {
      console.log(data[post].client_id); //return undefined
}

this is the correct form to iterate using for... in

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for answer! – rizidoro Aug 9 '12 at 22:08
for (post in data) {
    console.log(post.client_id); //return undefined
}

you're doing this wrong, try it like this:

for (post in data) {
    console.log(data[post].client_id); //return undefined
}

you should actually also include a filter, since stuff from the prototype can leak in:

for (post in data) {
    if (data.hasOwnProperty(post)) {
        console.log(data[post].client_id); //return undefined
    }
}
share|improve this answer

It's because of the structure of your JSON. Notice that you've got an outer object with only a single top-level property: data.

{ "data":
    [
        {"id":1,"client_id":1},
        {"id":2,"client_id":1}
    ]
}

data doesn't have a client_id property: it's an array of the sub-entries that you're trying to iterate over, and those have client_id properties. This is why your loop that indexes data works.

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