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I am parsing a JSON file using C#. Here is what I got from the server:

loadData([ 
{"id":"id1","nm":"name1"}, 
{"id":"id2","nm":"name2"}, 
{"id":"id3","nm":"name3"}
]);

This is not the entire string, as I have deleted some of the values to make it appear more straightforward.

As you can see, this JSON is not parseable because it ends with semicolon (;) and has a bunch of other issues which need to be fixed.

Now that I have this data, is there any workaround I can do on the client side to parse this JSON?

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The server gave you more than the JSON file. It gave you loadData(jsonData); with jsonData looking like this :

[ 
    {"id":"id1","nm":"name1"}, 
    {"id":"id2","nm":"name2"}, 
    {"id":"id3","nm":"name3"}
]

So you will have to parse this to extract the JSON file.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes. The server is giving you JSONP, which is JSON wrapped with a function call (used for cross-domain loading of JSON data through the use of a JavaScript callback). – Jacob Aug 9 '12 at 23:03
    
Hi Thank you, just wondering if you got a chance to guess the reason why they give out a loadData(jsonData) instead of a regular Json file? any advantage? – Allan Jiang Aug 9 '12 at 23:04
    
@Jacob Hi Thank you for your explanation. So how I can take advantage of this from client side? – Allan Jiang Aug 9 '12 at 23:06
1  
Since you're getting this via C#, you'll have to use regex or other string manipulations to extract the parts inside of the parentheses. Or you may have an alternative way to call the server for the data where you'll get back JSON instead of JSONP (a slightly different URL, perhaps). – Jacob Aug 9 '12 at 23:14

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