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Look at the bottom of this post, for final working code.

It's a working Python/CGI script which can get user-input to a CGI-script by calling another script which then sends it's commands through a local socket.


Original post:

As far as I know, there isn't any way to send user input directly to a Python/CGI script which has allready sent it's header. Like, warning the user under specific circumstances and waiting for a confirmation. Neither have I been able to find any published solutions to this.

If I'm wrong, please correct me.

I currently have a Python script which can connect to servers, upload firmware, reboot, re-connect, change a few configuration files and such.

Sometimes, it would help alot of the user could send input to script, without having to re-launch the script and execute it from the beginning. Re-connecting over a 2G network takes too long.

I'm thinking that it must be possible to send user input to another script, which then posts it to a file, which the first/main script is watching, until it recieves the input. It would also be nice, if the was able to stop the execution of the script, with a stop/kill input command. As for the stop/kill command, the main script would need to have 2 threads. If it did not, it would know it should stop the script, if a process such as a large file upload is being executed, before the upload is completed.

At the same time, I think multipe users should be able to use the script at the same time. Therefore, a unique ID must be generated every time the main script launches.

Here's how I think it could be made:

Main script gets called

Global variable with a unique session ID is generated and sent to client.

Thread 1
    pexpect spawns a "tail -F /var/www/cgi/tmp_cmd.log"

Thread 2
    Thread status "Busy"
    Connects to network element
    Does its usual stuff until it reaches a point where the user needs to interact.
    Prints the message to user and waits for Thread 1 with a timeout of x seconds.
    Thread status "Ready"

Second script gets called by the user through AJAX with 2 headers (session ID & input)

Second script

Session ID and user input is saved to "/var/www/cgi/tmp_cmd.log"
Execution of the input script ends

Main script

Thread 1 
    User input recieved.
    Wait for Thread 2 status to become "Ready" or ignore status if command is equals to "kill" ect.
    Send user input (single line) and start Thread 1 from the beginning
Thread 2 
    Thread 2 status "Busy"
    Input recieved and process stops/continues.
    Thread 2 status "Ready"

I have made a script allready for connecting, uploading files, and running commands. However, it cannot recieve user-input.

I could really use some good help, or someone to tell me how to approach this.

Of course, whenever the script has been completed, I will post it here or on pastebin and link to it, for other people to use. :)


Final code

With help from the post below, I have finally have the working code. It could use Threads, but stopping/cancelling processes appeared to be way easier for me to figure out.

Client - cgi_send.py

#!/usr/bin/python
import sys, cgi, cgitb, socket

cgitb.enable()
TASKS_DIR = "/var/www/cgi-bin/tmp"

def main():
    global TASKS_DIR

    url = cgi.FieldStorage()
    cmd = str(url.getvalue('cmd'))
    sessionId = str(url.getvalue('session'))
    socketLocation = TASKS_DIR + '/%s.socket' % sessionId

    print '<a href="?session='+sessionId+'&cmd=QUIT">End script</a>&nbsp;<a href="?session='+sessionId+'&cmd=CANCEL">Cancel task</a>'
    print '<form action=""><input type="hidden" name="session" id="session" value="'+sessionId+'" /><input type="text" name="cmd" id="cmd" value="" /><input type="submit" value="Fun!" />'

    try:

        sock = socket.socket(socket.AF_UNIX)
        sock.setblocking(0)
        sock.connect(socketLocation)
        sock.send(cmd)
        sock.close()
        print '<br />Command sent: '+ cmd;

    except IOError:
        print '<br /><b>Operation failed.</b><br /> Could not write to socket: '+ socketLocation
        pass

    sock.close()

    sys.exit();

if __name__ == '__main__':
    sys.stdout.write("Content-type:text/html;charset=utf-8\r\n\r\n")
    sys.stdout.write('<!DOCTYPE html>\n<html><head><title>Test</title></head><body>')

    main()

    print '</body></html>'
    sys.exit()

Server

#!/usr/bin/python
import sys, os, socket, uuid, time, multiprocessing

# Options
TASKS_DIR = "/var/www/cgi-bin/tmp/"

def main():

    sessionId = str(uuid.uuid4())

    print 'Session ID: '+ sessionId
    sys.stdout.write ('<br /><a href="cgi_send.py?cmd=test&session=' + sessionId +'" target="cmd_window">Send test command</a>')
    sys.stdout.flush()

    address = os.path.join(TASKS_DIR, '%s.socket' % sessionId)

    sock = socket.socket(socket.AF_UNIX)
    sock.setblocking(0)
    sock.settimeout(.1)
    sock.bind(address)
    sock.listen(1)

    taskList = [foo_task, foo_task, foo_task]

    try:
        for task in taskList:

            print "<br />Starting new task"
            runningTask = multiprocessing.Process(target=task)
            runningTask.daemon = True # Needed to make KeyboardInterrupt possible when testing in shell
            runningTask.start()

            while runningTask.is_alive():
                conn = None
                try:
                    conn, addr = sock.accept()
                    data = conn.recv(100).strip()

                except socket.timeout:
                    # nothing ready from a client
                    continue

                except socket.error, e:
                    print "<br />Connection Error from client"

                else:
                    print "<br />"+ data
                    sys.stdout.flush()
                    conn.close()

                    if data == "CANCEL":
                        # temp way to cancel our task
                        print "<br />Cancelling current task."
                        runningTask.terminate()

                    elif data == "QUIT":
                        print "<br />Quitting entire process." 
                        runningTask.terminate()
                        taskList[:] = []

                finally:
                    if conn:
                        conn.close()

    except (KeyboardInterrupt, SystemExit):
        print '\nReceived keyboard interrupt, quitting threads.'

    finally:
        sock.close()
        os.remove(address)

def foo_task():
    i = 1
    while 10 >= i:
        print "<br />Wating for work... "+ str(i)
        sys.stdout.flush()
        i = i + 1
        time.sleep(1)


if __name__ == '__main__':
    sys.stdout.write("Content-type:text/html;charset=utf-8\r\n\r\n")
    sys.stdout.write('<!DOCTYPE html>\n<html><head><title>Test</title></head><body>')

    main()

    print '</body></html>'
    sys.exit()
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

A CGI script is a pretty primitive operation. It works basically the same as any normal script you run from your command shell. An http request is made to the web server. The server starts a new process and passes the arguments in via stdin to the script. At this point, it's like a normal script.

A script can't get any more input unless it's looking for input by some means, so you are correct in assuming that once the headers are sent, the web client can no longer directly send more input, because the request is already in progress, and the response is already in progress as well.

A thread watching a file is one way to introduce a control loop to the script. Another is to open a UNIX socket to a path based on your unique ID for each instance. Then have the thread sitting on the socket for input. What you would then have to do is pass the ID back to the web client. And the client could make a call to the second script with the ID, which would then know the proper UNIX socket path to send control commands to: ie.

/tmp/script-foo/control/<id>.socket

You actually might only need 1 thread. You main thread could simply loop over checking for information on the socket, and monitoring the current operation being run in a thread or subprocess. It might be like this in pseudocode:

uid = generate_unique_id()
sock = socket.socket(AF_UNIX)
sock.bind('/tmp/script-foo/control/%s.socket' % uid)
# and set other sock options like timeout

taskList = [a,b,c]
for task in taskList:
    runningTask = start task in thread/process
    while runningTask is running:
        if new data on socket, with timeout N ms
            if command == restart:
                kill runningTask
                taskList = [a,b,c]
                break
            else:
                process command

When the web client sends a command via ajax to your second script, it might look like this in pseudocode:

jobid = request.get('id')
cmd = request.get('cmd')
sock = socket.socket(socket.AF_UNIX)
sock.connect('/tmp/script-foo/control/%s.socket' % jobid)
sock.sendall(cmd)
sock.close()

Update

Based on your code update, here is a working example of what I was suggesting:

import sys
import os
import socket
import uuid 
import time 

# Options
TASKS_DIR = "."

def main():

    sessionId = str(uuid.uuid4())

    print 'Session ID: '+ sessionId
    sys.stdout.write ('<br /><a href="cgi_send.py?cmd=test&session=' + sessionId +'" target="_blank">Send test command</a>')
    sys.stdout.flush()

    address = os.path.join(TASKS_DIR, '%s.socket' % sessionId)

    sock = socket.socket(socket.AF_UNIX)
    sock.setblocking(0)
    sock.settimeout(.1)
    sock.bind(address)
    sock.listen(1)


    fakeTasks = [foo_task, foo_task, foo_task]

    try:
        for task in fakeTasks:

            # pretend we started a task
            runningTask = task()
            # runningTask = Thread(target=task) 
            # runningTask.start()

            # while runningTask.is_alive():   
            while runningTask:
                conn = None
                try:
                    conn, addr = sock.accept()
                    data = conn.recv(100).strip()

                except socket.timeout:
                    # nothing ready from a client
                    continue

                except socket.error, e:
                    print "<br />Connection Error from client"

                else:
                    print "<br />"+ data
                    sys.stdout.flush()
                    conn.close()

                    # for the thread version, you will need some 
                    # approach to kill or interrupt it. 
                    # This is just simulating. 
                    if data == "CANCEL":
                        # temp way to cancel our task
                        print "<br />Cancelling current task." 
                        runningTask = False

                    elif data == "QUIT":
                        print "<br />Quitting entire process." 
                        runningTask = False 
                        fakeTasks[:] = []

                finally:
                    if conn:
                        conn.close()

    finally:
        sock.close()
        os.remove(address)



def foo_task():
    print 'foo task'
    return True


if __name__ == '__main__':
    sys.stdout.write("Content-type:text/html;charset=utf-8\r\n\r\n")
    sys.stdout.write('<!DOCTYPE html>\n<html><head><title>Test</title></head><body>')

    main()

    print '</body></html>'
    sys.exit()

Instead of using a 10 second global timeout, you set it to something small like 100ms. It loops over each task and starts it (eventually in a thread), and then tries to loop over waiting for a socket connection. If there is no connection within 100ms, it will timeout and continue to loop, while checking if the task is done. At any point, a client can connect and issue either a "CANCEL" or "QUIT" command. The socket will accept the connection, read it, and react.

You can see how you do not need multiple threads here for the solution. The only threading or subprocess you need is to run the task.

share|improve this answer
    
I've added my new code, based on your feedback to my question. I still can't figure out how to solve the problem. :) –  Drejer Aug 10 '12 at 13:48
    
@Drejer: No problem. I think you were just missing the concept. I have added a working example to my answer for you. Let me know if you need explanation on it. –  jdi Aug 10 '12 at 17:46
    
I've tried adding content to the foo_task() but it doesn't seem to execute the code within it. –  Drejer Aug 11 '12 at 13:49
    
I dont know how you are doing it specifically but you can clearly seethe foo task runs because it prints. This is not how you would do it exactly because you will be lauching the task in a thread or process so they dont block the loop. And you will just be checkind if they are alive or not. –  jdi Aug 11 '12 at 15:06
    
I forgot to flush the buffer. Silly me. :) I've now added the foo_task to my post. If it returns True at the end, it never moves on to next task, unless I cancel it. If it returns False, it doesn't respond to commands sent to the script. –  Drejer Aug 11 '12 at 16:06
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