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If I want to add styling to all p elements inside of a div, why should I use

div > p{

  *style here*

}

as opposed to just

div p{

  *style here*

}

furthermore, if I want to use a pseudo class, why would I then choose to use ">"

div > p:first-child{

  *style here*

}

instead of

 div p:first-child{

   *style here*

 }

Are there any benefits or drawbacks? what does that operator do?

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If you read the specification you could find out all this stuff.. and ask a more refined/focused question, should any questions remain. –  user166390 Aug 10 '12 at 1:06
    
possible duplicate of What does ">" mean in CSS rules? –  John Conde Aug 10 '12 at 3:27

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

It's the direct child, not a recursive match.

CSS

div > p {

}

HTML

<div>
   <p>Match</p>
   <span>
      <p>No match</p>
   </span>
</div>

CSS

div p {

}

Markup

<div>
   <p>Match</p>
   <span>
      <p>Match</p>
   </span>
</div>
share|improve this answer
    
Child Combinator (from the W3 CSS3 spec) –  steveax Aug 10 '12 at 0:58
    
but isn't the > unnecessary if i have :first-child after the p in my stylesheet? –  kjh Aug 10 '12 at 1:01
    
:first-child is for first child only. > is for all direct childes :) –  Miljan Puzović Aug 10 '12 at 1:06
    
ahh took me a while to understand, direct child just means the p is not nested within another element inside the div. for some reason, "direct child" registered to me as "first child". thanks for this. –  kjh Aug 10 '12 at 1:09
    
You really shouldn't wrap a p in a span though. The browser may do something unexpected with that. –  steveax Aug 10 '12 at 1:12

Because it means direct child.

Your second example would match the p in this example

<div>
  <header>
    <p>
    </p>
  </header>
</div>
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> and (space) are relationship selectors meaning "child" and "descendant" respectively. On top of the semantic differences others have pointed out, a child selector computes faster as it avoids redundant DOM tree traversal on non-matching elements.

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