Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Right now my pages look something like this:

if($_GET['something'] == 'somevalue')
{
    $output .= 'somecode';

    // make a DB query, fetch a row
    //...
    $row = $stmt->Fetch(PDO::ASSOC);

    if($row != null)
    {
        $output .= 'morecode';

        if(somethingIsOK())
        {
            $output .= 'yet more page output';
        }
        else
        {
            $error = 'something is most definitely not OK.';
        }
    }
    else
    {
        $error = 'the row does not exist.';
    }
}
else
{
    $error = 'something is not a valid value';
}

if($error == '') // no error
{
    //display $output on page
}
else // an error
{
    // display whatever error occurred on the page
}

The way I'm doing things works, but it's very cumbersome and tedious for what is probably obvious: suppose that I call a function somewhere in the middle of my code, or want to check the value of a variable, or verify a DB query returned a valid result, and if it fails I want to output an error? I would have to make another if/else block and move all of the code inside the new if block. This doesn't seem like a smart way of doing things.

I have been reading about try/catch and have been thinking of putting all of my code inside a try statement, then let the code run sequentially without any if/else blocks and if something fails just throw an exception. From what I've read, that would halt the execution and make it jump straight to the catch block (just as a failed if statement will go to the else block), where I could then output the error message. But is that an acceptable or standard practice?

What's the best way of handling errors, fatal or not, in a php application that builds and outputs an HTML page? I don't want to just die with a blank screen, as that would be very user un-friendly, but instead want to output a message in the body of the page, still allowing the header and footer to show.

Thanks for your advice!

share|improve this question
    
I use exit($error) myself, like: if($some_error == TRUE){exit('Error.');}Hopefully it's not a bad practice. –  AzizAG Aug 10 '12 at 2:07
1  
@AzizAG - not a bad idea, but I have a wrapper on my pages that includes a header and footer and if there is an error I want it to appear in a graphically pleasing manner. (i.e. I don't want to just die with a blank white page with an error message). –  Nate Aug 10 '12 at 2:16
    
@Nate I lied, I never use exit directly. I have a function named exitApp($error) which : (1) displays the header (2) echo the $error (3) displays the footer (4) and finally exiting the application. –  AzizAG Aug 10 '12 at 4:23
    
@AzizAG that's what uncaught exceptions do, so you might just switch to exceptions. See my answer, it shows you how to enable PDO to throw exceptions and how to transform all PHP errors into exceptions (PHP has the ErrorException class especially for this purpose). –  Tiberiu-Ionuț Stan Aug 14 '12 at 12:22
add comment

7 Answers

up vote 23 down vote accepted
+200

There are a lot of ways that you can deal with this and frankly none of them is intrinsically 'right'.

You will have to decide for yourself, which method is more 'comfortable' for you - it's always a mater of preferences (although there are certain techniques you should avoid and for good reasons).

It will highly depend on how you split your logic, however I tend to enclose all code that can return non-fatal errors inside a function, and use a return value of said function to indicate there was an error.

For fatal errors I tend to use exceptions (with try-catch blocks).

Now just to be clear:

  • A non-fatal error is an error that you can recover from - meaning that even though something went wrong, there is still some code that can be executed and generate some valuable output. For example if you wanted to get current time using NTP protocol, but the server didn't respond, you can decide to use local time function and still display a some valuable data to the user.
  • A fatal error is an error that you would not be able to recover from - meaning that something really bad happened and the only thing you can do is tell your user that page cannot do what it was asked to. For example if you were fetching some data from your database and got SQL Exception - there is no valuable data to be shown and you can only inform the user of this.

Non-Fatal Errors (using function return)

A good example of using function-returns as a way of dealing with non-fatal problems would be a function that is trying to display content of some file on the page when this is not the main objective of the page (for example you would have a function that displays badges, fetched from a text file, on every single page - I know that this is far fetched but bear with me).

function getBadge($file){
    $f = fopen($file,'r');
    if(!$f){
        return null;
    }
    .. do some processing ..
    return $badges;
}

$badges = getBadges('badges.txt');
if(!$badges){
    echo "Cannot display badges.";
} else {
    echo $badges;
}
.. carry on doing whatever page should be doing ..

In fact, the function fopen itself is an example of this - it will return.

Returns a file pointer resource on success, or FALSE on error.


Fatal-Errors (using exceptions - try-catch)

When you have some piece of code that needs to be executed because it's exactly what the user wanted (for example reading all news from database and displaying them to the user), you could use exceptions. Let's take a simple example - a user visited his profile and wanted to see all the messages he's got (let's assume, for now, that they are stored in plain text). You might have a function like:

function getMessages($user){
    $messages = array();
    $f = fopen("messages_$user.txt","r");
    if(!$f){
        throw new Exception("Could not read messages!");
    }
    ... do some processing ...
    return $messages;
}

And use it like this:

try{
    ..do some stuff..
    $messages = getMessages($_SESSION['user'])); //assuming you store username in $_SESSION
    foreach($messages as $msg){
        echo $msg."<br/>";
    }
} catch(Exception $e){
    echo "Sorry, there was an error: ".$e->getMessage();
}

Now this could come in handy, if you had a 'top-level' script that would execute all the other code. That means that, for example, in your index.php you would just have:

try{
    .. execute some code, perform some functions ..
} catch(Exception $e){
    echo "Sorry, there was an error: ".$e->getMessage();
}

Do not overuse exceptions!

Whatever you do, never use exceptions as a way to check something you can recover from. Have a read on another question(full credit goes to Anton Gogolev for a very good explanation on this, as well as other answer-ers) as to why this is the case.

Further reading

Now there is no better way to learn how to deal with errors than to try several things and see what is good for you. You might find the below useful:

Hope this helps :)

share|improve this answer
    
By the way, I assume you mean badges.txt not bages.txt? –  uınbɐɥs Aug 18 '12 at 21:31
    
@ShaquinTrifonoff: Ah yes indeed, a typo :) Thanks for the edit! :) –  Bart Platak Aug 18 '12 at 21:42
    
Agree with most of this, except for the warning against overuse of exceptions. Java, for instance, uses them everywhere. Python uses a StopIteration exception, which should seriously anger the anti-exception crowd. :) –  pestilence669 Aug 18 '12 at 22:12
    
@Pestilence one of the things I love about Java. Sadly I don't think PHP was designed to use exceptions in non-exceptional situations, or as normal flow-control. Try debugging long PHP code that uses exceptions as normal flow-control - it's painful. Performance can be affected too. –  Bart Platak Aug 18 '12 at 22:23
1  
@norfavrell Are you really citing slower PHP performance as a reason to avoid exceptions? :) lol. I agree that debugging is a pain, but I rarely debug as I am a big fan of PHPUnit. I don't think the OP is speaking about normal control flow, just errors. Still, even exceptions get this wrong: JDBC: Ever written the proper triple-nested try-catch-finally construct for a quick read?? –  pestilence669 Aug 18 '12 at 22:29
show 3 more comments

This is much more elegant and readable.

try
{

    if($_GET['something'] != 'somevalue') 
    {
        throw new Exception ('something is not a valid value');
    }


    $output .= 'somecode';

    // make a DB query, fetch a row
    //...
    $row = $stmt->Fetch(PDO::ASSOC);

    if($row == null)
    {
        throw new Exception ('the row does not exist.');
    }


    $output .= 'morecode';


    if(somethingIsOK())
    {
        $output .= 'yet more page output';
    }
    else
    {
        throw new Exception ('something is most definitely not OK.');
    }


    echo $output;

}
catch (Exception $e)
{
    echo $e->getMessage();
}
share|improve this answer
1  
This is what I was envisioning when I asked my question, but I wasn't sure whether it was a proper use of try/catch or not. –  Nate Aug 14 '12 at 13:22
    
Could you upvote it then? –  Edson Medina Aug 17 '12 at 10:00
add comment

Using try-catch is one of the cleanest solutions you can use.

I have made an example that still displays the header and footer when an error occurs, using your code converted to the try-catch format:

PHP:

<?php
try {
    $output = array();
    if($_GET['something'] != 'somevalue') throw new Exception('something does not have a valid value.');
    $output[] = 'Some Code';
    $row = mt_rand(0, 10) < 5 ? null : mt_rand(0, 100);
    if($row === null) throw new Exception('The row does not exist.');
    $output[] = $row;
    if(!somethingIsOK()) throw new Exception('Something is most definitely not OK.');
    $output[] = 'Yet more page output';
} catch(Exception $e) {
    $output[] = 'Error: ' . $e->getMessage(); // To show output and error
    $output = array('Error: ' . $e->getMessage()); // To only show error
}
function somethingIsOK() {
    return mt_rand(0, 10) < 5;
}
?>

HTML:

<!DOCTYPE HTML>
<html lang="en-US">
<head>
    <meta charset="UTF-8" />
    <title>PHP Error test</title>
    <style type="text/css">
body {
    background: #eee;
    text-align: center
}
#content {
    padding: 60px
}
#header {
    padding: 30px;
    background: #fff
}
#footer {
    padding: 10px;
    background: #ddd
}
    </style>
</head>
<body>
    <div id="header">Header</div>
    <div id="content">
<?php echo implode('<br />', $output); ?>

    </div>
    <div id="footer">Footer</div>
</body>
</html>

References:

share|improve this answer
add comment

Here's something simple, which I'm using in some sensitive applications.

For PHP errors (non-exception errors):

 //top most for any execution path (will throw ErrorException for any error/warning/notice/whatever)..
 set_error_handler(function($nNumber, $strMessage, $strFilePath, $nLineNumber){
      error_log(PHP_EOL.date("Y-m-d H:m:s", time())." ".$strFilePath."#".$nLineNumber.": ".$strMessage.PHP_EOL);
      throw new ErrorException($strMessage, 0, $nNumber, $strFilePath, $nLineNumber);
 });
 error_reporting(-1);

PDO supports throwing PDOExceptions, but the default is off, so you have to do this in order to not have to check every single query or exec if it returned false. You can now safely fetch from the result (without checking for false, it will no longer return false on error), and just check if fetch returned the expected number of rows (or false if no rows), or if an exec has affected the expected number of rows.

 $pdoDBHandle->setAttribute(PDO::ATTR_ERRMODE, PDO::ERRMODE_EXCEPTION);

Catching exceptions is where you have to make a choice depending on your type of application:

  • for a website (or a website like interface for some app), use set_exception_handler to redirect to an error page (don't forget to log the error).
  • for non websites (applications which just expose a RPC server) use try catch handling. Define class derived from Exception to use specifically for Exceptions which are allowed to "not be caught" (will be sent out with the RPC response). All other Exception types (classes) should be caught, logged, silenced and replaced with that "outside use" Exception class with error message "Internal error".

Try not to use exceptions for function return (or communication), unless it is the only option available to you (and still reconsider some more if that's true).

share|improve this answer
1  
The set_error_handler "fix" for the useless PHP errors (useless because an error should always interrupt execution) can be converted to work with PHP < 5.3.3, just declare a function, instead of using an annymous (lambda) function like the above. –  Tiberiu-Ionuț Stan Aug 13 '12 at 15:01
    
For redirecting to an error page, use a combination of header and HTML meta (maybe even JS). Only for this error redirection, do use the error supressor operator @ on the header("Location: ") line. –  Tiberiu-Ionuț Stan Aug 13 '12 at 15:06
add comment

PDO error exception handling for queries, and really all code should be run through:

try{

}

catch{


}

finally{

}

The reason for this, is it makes debugging much easier when you can pinpoint roughly where in lengthy scripts an error is occuring

more info here: http://php.net/manual/en/language.exceptions.php

share|improve this answer
4  
I believe finally{} is only in RFC-land right now and not actually usable. –  Erty Aug 17 '12 at 0:41
    
Its for future use. Its good for the OP to know about the potentials of this in the future. Good point though. –  CodeTalk Aug 19 '12 at 16:57
add comment

Create error handler (set_error_handler) and throw exceptions inside it.
It will help for functions, that don't support exceptions.

share|improve this answer
add comment

If you're searching for a code structure which will look pretty and will work - you could use the whitelist method I always use. For example - validating a $_GET variable:

$error = false;

if(!isset($_GET['var'])) 
{
    $error = 'Please enter var\'s value';
}
elseif(empty($_GET['var'])) 
{
    $error = 'Var shouldn\'t be empty';
}
elseif(!ctype_alnum($_GET['var'])) 
{
    $error = 'Var should be alphanumeric';
}

//if we have no errors -> proceed to db part
if(!$error) 
{
    //inserting var into database table
}

So, this is it , just 2 if/elseif blocks, without nesting

share|improve this answer
    
Downvoters , please explain –  Noobie Aug 18 '12 at 20:05
    
I didn't downvote, but Nate is looking for something without if statements, so that the code requires minimal amounts of code to be added if features are to be added. –  uınbɐɥs Aug 18 '12 at 22:12
    
This is what if/else blocks were made for - for checking variables and values –  Noobie Aug 30 '12 at 11:26
    
True, they are, but it is not an efficient way to handle errors. Also, this is basically what @Nate already has. –  uınbɐɥs Aug 30 '12 at 19:58
    
@ShaquinTrifonoff , @Nate uses nested if/else blocks, that aren't good for error checking , this is why I've proposed this method ;) Cheers –  Noobie Sep 2 '12 at 11:19
show 1 more comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.