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I have the following structure:

struct localframepos
{
    double ipos; //local room frame i(x) coordinate, in mm
    double cpos; //local room frame c(y) coordinate, in mm
    double rpos; //local room frame r(z) coordinate, in mm

    localframepos()
    {
        ipos = 0;
        cpos = 0;
        rpos = 0;
    }
    localframepos(double init_ipos, double init_cpos, double init_rpos) //init constructor
    {
        ipos = init_ipos;
        cpos = init_cpos;
        rpos = init_rpos;
    } 
};

How do I get the following functionality:

localframepos positions[] = { {0, .5, .2},
                              {4.5, 4, .5} };
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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Remove the constructors. To use curly brace initialization, the type has to be a POD.

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Isn't it "has to be POD"? –  Anthony Vallée-Dubois Aug 10 '12 at 1:16
    
What is non-POD?? –  CodeKingPlusPlus Aug 10 '12 at 1:16
    
@pwny true..... –  Luchian Grigore Aug 10 '12 at 1:17
    
Why C++11, this is simple aggregate initialization. –  Jesse Good Aug 10 '12 at 1:17
    
@CodeKingPlusPlus Plain Old Data –  Anthony Vallée-Dubois Aug 10 '12 at 1:18

I usually use

localframepos positions[] = { localframepos(0  , .5, .2),
                              localframepos(4.5, 4, .5) };

which is not that nice looking, but much more flexible if you need different initialization possibilities.

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For C++03 you can write

localframepos positions[] = { localframepos( 0, .5, .2 ),
                              localframepos( 4.5, 4, .5 ) };
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