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I am writing a client that supports loading of an old game format. It uses fake lighting where for every vertex, there is often a vertex color supplied. I got the lighting to appear correctly by using:

vec4 textureColor = texture2D(texture, outtexture) * vertexColor;

The problem was that for vertices supplied that were 0.0, 0.0, 0.0 for RGB, the entire texture was of course black. I have been playing around with a few different algorithms but the textures still look a bit dark or the lights are too bright.

Here is the shader:

float ambient = 1.0;

vec4 textureColor = texture2D(texture, outtexture);
vec4 lighting = vec4((vertexColor * vertexColor.a) + (ambient * textureColor));

gl_FragColor = textureColor * lighting;

Here is an example:

Textures with no light are too dark

Now, the vertex color data is a bit weird too. Here's an example:

<-!-> R: 0.000000, G: 0.000000, B: 0.000000, A: 0.000000
<-!-> R: 0.000000, G: 0.000000, B: 0.000000, A: 0.000000
<-!-> R: 0.000000, G: 0.000000, B: 0.000000, A: 0.000000
<-!-> R: 0.023529, G: 0.023529, B: 0.003922, A: 0.858824
<-!-> R: 0.007843, G: 0.007843, B: 0.000000, A: 0.850980
<-!-> R: 0.007843, G: 0.007843, B: 0.000000, A: 0.858824
<-!-> R: 0.023529, G: 0.023529, B: 0.003922, A: 0.858824
<-!-> R: 0.050980, G: 0.050980, B: 0.011765, A: 0.882353
<-!-> R: 0.078431, G: 0.078431, B: 0.015686, A: 0.858824
<-!-> R: 0.078431, G: 0.078431, B: 0.015686, A: 0.858824
<-!-> R: 0.050980, G: 0.050980, B: 0.011765, A: 0.894118
<-!-> R: 0.031373, G: 0.031373, B: 0.007843, A: 0.862745
<-!-> R: 0.050980, G: 0.050980, B: 0.011765, A: 0.882353
<-!-> R: 0.050980, G: 0.050980, B: 0.011765, A: 0.894118
<-!-> R: 0.031373, G: 0.031373, B: 0.007843, A: 0.858824
<-!-> R: 0.000000, G: 0.000000, B: 0.000000, A: 0.858824
<-!-> R: 0.000000, G: 0.000000, B: 0.000000, A: 0.835294

Notice that it contains some normal values (0, 0, 0, 0) and some regular ones with decimal numbers as well as values that are 0, 0, 0 and then have an alpha defined.

Feel free to chime in if you have seen this method or have any suggestions for how to achieve a normal looking render. Yes, I realize this question is a bit different but hopefully someone should have some insight.

Edit: If this helps at all, a friend of mine had a similar project. This was how he loaded the information and packaged it for DirectX:

     int iBlue  = GetByte( );
     int iGreen = GetByte( );
     int iRed   = GetByte( );
     int iAmb   = GetByte( );

     pVertex->m_dwDiffuse = D3DCOLOR_ARGB( (BYTE)( max( iAmb,     1 ) ), 
                                           (BYTE)( max( iRed,     1 ) ), 
                                           (BYTE)( max( iGreen,   1 ) ),
                                           (BYTE)( max( iBlue,    1 ) ) );

I am assuming he does exactly what I do and converts the bytes to integers and then if they are negative, he replaces them with 1. Still wish I knew how he used them while rendering...

What it's supposed to look like:

Day (Much less/almost no light being seen) enter image description here

Night:

enter image description here

Mine (with the above shader code): enter image description here

It appears that the lights are either too bright or their black contribution to the textures makes them too hard to see.

share|improve this question
2  
@user827992 Yes, this is about a game but not game development related. I think it falls more under programming/OpenGL and reverse engineering. –  Pladnius Brooks Aug 10 '12 at 2:50
1  
The problem with this question is that, ultimately, there's no way to answer it. There are many possible ways to interpret a vertex color for baked vertex lighting; some of them are more "realistic" than others. But without seeing what it is supposed to look like, it's pretty much impossible for us to replicate the exact method you're trying to replicate. Which basically means any answers given would be guesses that you would have to verify. In general, good questions are those where one can know that the answer they give is correct, rather than having to have it verified. –  Nicol Bolas Aug 10 '12 at 3:15
    
@NicolBolas Good point. I will do just that. Give me a minute. –  Satchmo Brown Aug 10 '12 at 3:29
    
@NicolBolas Updated. Basically, my algorithm produces textures that are too dark or lights that are too bright and often a combination. What algorithm do people usually use to integrate vertices and textures. –  Pladnius Brooks Aug 10 '12 at 4:06
    
if you double check your math, you're squaring your texture color when you multiply it by your lighting term which has your texture color in it already. that's almost certainly going to give you incorrect results with blacks too blacks and whites too white- exactly what you're seeing. try replacing the ambient * textureColor in your lighting term with just ambient and see if that helps- it will at least get rid of the too-high-contrast that you're seeing. –  Joshua Glazer Aug 10 '12 at 7:12

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