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Im looking for information about how the IMAP protocol works. Google yields only high level information, but not enough to understand the details. I'd like to know enough to be able to create my own implementation. I found a c library which does it, but is poorly documented.

Some basic questions are: what are the IMAP uid's and what are their guaruntees? For example, will an id ever change? will it be reused if deleted?

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Well, you wanted the details. Here it is: rfc3501. I really wouldn't recommend implementing it yourself. –  Woody Aug 10 '12 at 2:40
    
@Woody That appears to be a draft, and its use as a specification would likely cause problems. –  Alex W Aug 10 '12 at 3:16
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@AlexW On the contrary, that is the de-facto IMAP specification, at least for the main protocol. R..'s answer links to the extensions and improvements. Just about all standardized internet specifications, like IMAP, HTTP, UDP, TCP, IP are published as RFCs. –  Woody Aug 10 '12 at 3:36
    
@Alex: All internet protocol standards are called "drafts" or "request for comments". It's a cultural thing. It doesn't make them any less official. –  R.. Aug 10 '12 at 4:02
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Any explanation for why the -1? –  chacham15 Aug 10 '12 at 4:15
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up vote 4 down vote accepted

This looks like a good starting point:

http://www.imapwiki.org/ImapRFCList

In general, the keyword you want when searching for details on an internet protocol is "RFC". Add that to your search along with the name of the protocol and you should get off to a good start.

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Google yields only high level information, but not enough to understand the details.

Google is a general search engine, and its results will only be as good as the search terms you supplied. If you want to get detailed and definitive technical information about a protocol or standard or programming language, you should start by searching for the specification; i.e. use "specification" as one of your search terms.

I'd like to know enough to be able to create my own implementation. I found a c library which does it, but is poorly documented.

  1. If you've already found an implementation, why would you want to create another? Or even know enough to (hypothetically) create another?
  2. I'm sure there are other open source implementations of IMAP around in various languages.
  3. It is a bit much to expect an implementation of IMAP to be sufficiently well documented as to serve as a specification.

Some basic questions are: what are the IMAP uid's and what are their guaruntees? For example, will an id ever change? will it be reused if deleted?

I expect that these questions can be answered by reading the IMAP specification; see RFC 3501

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Just because you've found an implementation doesn't mean it's any good. :-) –  R.. Aug 10 '12 at 4:03
    
Just because an implementation exists, that doesnt mean that you know how to use it. This is why I was asking about the ids; the implementation references them but I have no idea how it is used. –  chacham15 Aug 10 '12 at 4:17
    
@chacham15 - knowing how to use a piece of software is a completely different problem to knowing how to write an alternative version. It is NOT the job of software documentation to tell you how to write a replacement for the software. That is the job of the protocol specification ... see the link. –  Stephen C Aug 10 '12 at 4:25
    
@R - true, but we don't know why it is "no good", or whether the OP has looked for better alternatives before taking the (probably unrealistic) decision that he needs to create his own implementation ... or even know enough to create his own implementation. –  Stephen C Aug 10 '12 at 4:27
    
@StephenC I find that knowing how the underlying protocol works lets you better understand the limitations and how any implementation works, especially ones with poor abstractions. –  chacham15 Aug 10 '12 at 4:38
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