Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I've a program which creates many instances of my own Class. Then I operate them: read, change, pass them to some third party methods etc.

There are three questions.

  1. Do I store an vector of instances or a vector of pointers? Why?

  2. If I do not want to change an instance do I pass to the function an instances or pointers to it? Why?

  3. If I do want to change an instance, do I pass a pointer or a reference? Why?

Thanks in advance!

Class example:

class Player {
    public:
        static const char               width = 35;
        static const char               height = 5;
        static const char               speed = 15;

        int                             socketFD;
        float                           xMin;
        float                           xMax;

        char                            status;
        float                           x;
        float                           y;
        char                            direction;

                                        Player ( int );
        void                            Reset();
        void                            Move();
        void                            SetHost();
        void                            SetClient();

    private:
        void                            EscapeCheck();
};
share|improve this question

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Do I store an array of instances or an array of pointers? Why?

In case your object is big (i.e. more than 2-3 primitive types) you'd want to store a array of pointers to dynamically allocated instances. This will make reordering objects and resizing/reallocating the container much faster. If you are making use of polymorphism, you pretty much have to use pointers (note that references are also polymorphic) to the base class. This will prevent slicing, since all elements of an array must be the same size, so if you want to store multiple objects, pointers to the base class are the way to go.

The cases where you might prefer storing the instances in the container is if you have a single type (no inheritance and polymorphism) and it is not that big (i.e. a few primitive member types). For bigger objects you might want to use a linked list instead of an array, in order to avoid costly inserts and reallocations.

If i do not want to change an instance do I pass to the function an instances or pointers to it? Why?

Pass a pointer to constant object or constant reference. Unless you are passing a primitive, where you can simply pass a cheap copy and avoid the modification of the original object. Whether it is a pointer to const object or a const reference is up to your usage scenario, references are easier to work with, like with normal instances, but cannot be changed to reference to other objects as pointers can.

If i do want to change an instance, do i pass a pointer or a reference? Why?

If you intend to change the instance, then pass either a pointer or a reference. Which one of the two - see above. This way you can directly modify the particular instance. You can also pass by value, but it will create one temporary copy, which you will later need to assign back to the original object. There is no point in doing that, and if modification is your intent, always go for pointers or references. Even if you don't intend to modify an object, it is still much cheaper to pass a constant pointer or reference, since those are the size of an int, whereas the object might be significantly bigger, so there is no point copying it. If you are passing a primitive type, you might as well pass by value, although if you intend to modify the object, you still have one extra assignment which is avoidable.

share|improve this answer
    
thank you for a reply. I have no polymorphism in my class, but it contains many variables. You say, I should store pointers to access the objects faster, right? I've updated the question btw... –  Kolyunya Aug 10 '12 at 13:15
    
Other guys say I should store instances... Who do I believe? –  Kolyunya Aug 10 '12 at 13:16
    
In fact I use a vector... Does it change anything? –  Kolyunya Aug 10 '12 at 13:29
    
@Kolyunya - your class is not that big, most members are either static or methods, static members are not per instance. If you use a fixed size array and do not plan to to add more elements / resize it, then go for an array of instances. –  ddriver Aug 10 '12 at 13:29
    
@Kolyunya - if you add more objects to the vector, it will eventually run out of capacity and will reallocate itself, if you have many objects reallocation might take a long time, you can minimize that by using pointers instead of instances. You have to test depending on your usage scenario. Seeing how it looks like it is game objects, you could probably get away with storing instances, I doubt you will store millions of them. –  ddriver Aug 10 '12 at 13:31

Do I store an array of instances or an array of pointers? Why?

If Class is a base class, and you want to prevent object slicing, you store pointers. Otherwise, objects.

If i do not want to change an instance do I pass to the function an instances or pointers to it? Why?

If you pass by value, you don't modify the original object because you're working on a copy. If you pass a pointer or a reference, you mark it as const:

void foo ( MyClass const* );
void foo ( MyClass const& );

If i do want to change an instance, do i pass a pointer or a reference? Why?

Either. I personally prefer references, pointers are more tightly connected to dynamic allocation.

Nowadays, RAII is often used, so an excellent alternative is to use smart pointers instead.

share|improve this answer
    
if Class is a base class, and you want to prevent object slicing, you store pointers... And if a Class is designed by me and consists of two strings and two integers for example? –  Kolyunya Aug 10 '12 at 7:47
    
@Kolyunya do you use it as a base class? Is it polymorphic? –  Luchian Grigore Aug 10 '12 at 7:51
    
I do not really know what is a base class at the moment. It's just a class with a number of constants, variables, methods. Lets say, it is not polymorphic. And what does it change if it is? –  Kolyunya Aug 10 '12 at 7:54
    
@Kolyunya for example, if you have class B derived from class A and a vector of A objects, if you insert B objects in the vector, they will be sliced. Polymorphism won't work any more. –  Luchian Grigore Aug 10 '12 at 7:58
    
In the debate pointers vs references, the rule of thumb is: 'Use references where you can and pointers where you have to.' –  Morwenn Aug 10 '12 at 8:02

Do I store an array of instances or an array of pointers? Why?

This really depends on the use case. Either solution can be OK, depending on context. You may want to store base classes of a polymorphic type, or you might want to avoid copying elements (for example, when dealing with non-copyable types). In these cases, you should store pointers or smart pointers.

If i do not want to change an instance do I pass to the function an instances or pointers to it? Why?

Then you should pass a const reference (reference to a const instance)

void foo(const Foo& f);

If i do want to change an instance, do i pass a pointer or a reference? Why?

Then you should pass a non-const reference (reference to a non-const instance). This assumes you really want to change an existing instance:

void foo(Foo& f);

But when would you use pointers then? Then only case I can think of right now is when there is a possibility for the passed entity to have an invalid or null value. With references this is impossible, or at least not trivial to implement. Pointers can be set to 0, NULL (the same) or nullptr in C++11.

void (Foo* f) {
  if (f) {
    // do something with pointee
  } else {
    // deal with it
  }
}
share|improve this answer

For number two, it kind of depends. Most efficient would probably be to pass a constant reference instead.

And generally, try to avoid pointers as much as possible. If you have to use pointers, use the smart pointers.

share|improve this answer
  1. Array of instances is better because you save on the pointer itself plus on the allocation block header. (Provided that array is fine for your needs).

2,3 In bothy cases it is better to pass refrerences. In the second case const ref. The advantage is saving on not calling ctors.

share|improve this answer
    
What do you mean ou save on the pointer itself? –  Luchian Grigore Aug 10 '12 at 7:24
    
Pointer occupies from 4 to 8 bytes. If you have 10^8 objects.... –  Kirill Kobelev Aug 10 '12 at 7:26
    
And if the object is larger than that (most probably it is)? –  Luchian Grigore Aug 10 '12 at 7:27
    
I had real situations when space, occupied by pointers was not negligible. This is not an every day scenario, but may happen. –  Kirill Kobelev Aug 10 '12 at 7:28
1  
@Gorpik you do know a vector makes copies of the object, right? –  Luchian Grigore Aug 10 '12 at 7:29

Do I store an array of instances or an array of pointers? Why?

I would prefer going for array of instances. You will have less of a headache managing memory. If you populate array of pointers dynamically, you may catch OOM at, say, 1000th element - now the program has to cleanup half-formed array. It is better in this sense to preallocate one big chunk in one go.

If i do not want to change an instance do I pass to the function an instances or pointers to it? Why? If i do want to change an instance, do i pass a pointer or a reference? Why?

I always prefer references, because then you can skip on checking its validity. Wikipedia says references can not be NULL, but I could kick NULL-references all around, because behavior is undefined and in my compiler it just happened to be that way. But if you account for that you are really on the dark side of the power. Alternatively, declaring function to accept pointers invites for passing NULL and you have to check for it always. There is nice blog describing null references - very good example that changed my mind.

One downside of using references is that you can not say from function call line of code whether function takes argument by value or by reference.

You should remember that references are essentially pointers and reference type has size, so if your Class is really small, then you might consider passing objects by value, if you dont want to change them inside function. I would still pass by reference though - Class can grow and then you go and fix all prototypes - not nice.

share|improve this answer
    
"Array of instances requires you to have default constructor and assignment operator available in your Class" no... –  Luchian Grigore Aug 10 '12 at 7:53
    
@LuchianGrigore Why no? Please elaborate. VisualStudio complains error 'C2512: 'A' : no appropriate default constructor available'. Are we speaking of some quirky way of array initialization? –  Roman Saveljev Aug 10 '12 at 7:54
    
You can initalize array objects with a non-default constructor, yes. Why is it quirky? –  Luchian Grigore Aug 10 '12 at 7:57
    
Yes, you are right: A a[2] = {A(5), A(6)};. Thanks for sharing your wisdom. I did not mean to sound aggressive –  Roman Saveljev Aug 10 '12 at 7:59
    
Why worry about passing NULL pointers? First, you have to actually do it, (ie. there has to be a gross bug in your code), and even then the most likely result is an almost immediate segfault/AV - easily debugged. Of all the things that can go wrong in apps, passing in a NULL somewhere is below the noise level. –  Martin James Aug 10 '12 at 7:59

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.