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Why does this Seg Fault?

I receive a segmentation fault when using ++ operator on a char *

#include<stdio.h>

int main()
{
    char *s = "hello";
    printf("%c ", ++(*s));
    return 0;
}

But if I do the following:

#include<stdio.h>

int main()
{
    char *s = "hello";
    char c = *s;
    printf("%c ", ++c);
    return 0;
}

Then the code compiles perfectly, what is the problem with the above code?

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marked as duplicate by Paul R, Kartik Anand, bstpierre, razlebe, Donal Fellows Aug 11 '12 at 6:06

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

6 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The first code snippet is attempting to modify a character in a string literal as:

++(*s)

is attempting to increment the first character in s. String literals are (commonly) read-only and an attempt to modify will cause the segmentation fault (the C standard states If the program attempts to modify such an array, the behavior is undefined.).

The second snippet is modifying a char variable, which is not read-only as after:

char c = *s;

c is a copy of the first character in s and c can be safely incremented.

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In the first case you modify a constant literal, and in the second you modify a variable.

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This code:

printf("%c ", ++(*s));

tries to modify a string literal through a pointer to one of its characters. Modifying string literals is undefined behavior - the quite likely outcome is that string literals are often stored in read-only memory, so it's technically illegal to modify them and that's why it manifests itself as segmentation fault on your system.

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char *s = "hello";

This implies that 's' is a const string.

If you need a non-const string, you should allocate it explicitly from heap.

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You are trying to change a string literal in the first case which is not allowed. In the second case you create a new char from the first character of the string literal. You modify the copy of that character and that is why the second case works.

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Your code does not have write permission for the segment where the string literal is stored.

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