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As part of my plan to improve my programming skills, I have decided to attempt to sort a large array of strings lexicographically (which later on I plan to do so using threading). I have researched different sorting algorithms and I have tried to implement a Merge Sort my self from what I understood. For now I plan to sort a few simple strings.

I am inputting the following strings to be sorted in the below method:

 string[] stringsArray = new string[] { "cixymn", "adfxij", "adxhxy", "abcdef", "iejfyq", "uqbzxo", "aaaaaa" };
 string[] stringSorted = MergeSort(stringsArray);

 // For display purposes
 foreach (string s in stringSorted)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Item at index " + Array.IndexOf(stringSorted, s) + " is " + s);
        }

The result I am getting is the following:

Item at index 0 is aaaaaa
Item at index 1 is abcdef
Item at index 2 is adfxij
Item at index 3 is uqbzxo
Item at index 4 is 
Item at index 4 is 
Item at index 4 is 

Since to implement the merge sort, you must first divide the array into two, I can easily understand that in this case, the left part is being sorted successfully whereas the right part is being ignored. I am under the impression that this is happening because I am comparing the characters of each string from the left side of the array in every recursion (thus possibly ignoring the right). So I think I actually understood where the problem MIGHT be. However, I do not quite know how to go about this. Any help would be very greatly appreciated.

Below is the code for the MergeSort method.

  private static string[] MergeSort(string[] stringsArray)
    {
        if (stringsArray.Length == 1)
        {
            return stringsArray;
        }

        int middle = stringsArray.Length / 2;

        string[] left = new string[middle];
        string[] right = new string[stringsArray.Length - middle];

        for (int i = 0; i < middle; i++)
        {
            left[i] = stringsArray[i];
        }

        for (int i = 0; i < stringsArray.Length - middle; i++)
        {
            right[i] = stringsArray[i + middle];
        }

        left = MergeSort(left);
        right = MergeSort(right);

        int leftPointer = 0;
        int rightPointer = 0;

        string[] sorted = new string[stringsArray.Length];

        for (int k = 0; k < stringsArray.Length; k++)
        {
            if (k == left.Length)
            {
                break;
            }

            for (int i = 0; i < left[leftPointer].Count(); i++)
            {
                var leftChar = left[leftPointer][i];

                if (i == right[rightPointer].Count())
                {
                    continue;
                }

                var rightChar = right[rightPointer][i];

                if ((rightPointer == right.Length || leftPointer < left.Length) && leftChar < rightChar)
                {
                    sorted[k] = left[leftPointer];
                    sorted[k + 1] = right[rightPointer];
                    leftPointer++;

                    break;
                }

                if ((leftPointer == left.Length || rightPointer < right.Length) && (rightChar < leftChar))
                {
                    sorted[k] = right[rightPointer];
                    sorted[k + 1] = left[leftPointer];
                    rightPointer++;
                    break;
                }
            }
        }

QUESTION #2 : How would you recommend optimizing the code in order to be able to use threading?

share|improve this question
    
Merge sort is an O(n log n) sorting algorithm. I see some nested for loops. –  Science_Fiction Aug 10 '12 at 8:19
    
Regarding your 2 question. I would recommend against using threading, because it is still O(N*Log(N)), but the code will be much more complicated and you may not get it write w/o heavy testing. KISS would usually outperform multithreaded code in this case. Also you may probably want to consider using Quicksort, as it usually performs a little bit faster then merge sort. Why don't you use libraries for this anyways? It's good for an exercises, but I wouldn't use this code in production - people spend literally years trying to optimise such simple things. –  oleksii Aug 10 '12 at 8:40
    
Science_Fiction Please elaborate. @oleksii I am doing all of this for the sake of improving my programming skills so I see no harm in actually trying to work with threads and experimenting on different sorting algorithms. the problem is that I cant proceed further if I dont solve the above issue. –  DottoreM Aug 10 '12 at 8:57
    
No, you are right. Multithreading this task will NOT make it more complex (unless you are planning to update the UI from within this method). However, the call to this sorting method will be as this is where you will wrap it in the relevent calls to facilitate multithreading. I would reccomend TPL for the threading part - it is awesome! –  Killercam Aug 10 '12 at 9:14

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Heres an answer I cribbed, genericised and brought up to date from here

public static IList<T> MergeSort<T>(
    this IList<T> unsorted,
    IComparer<T> comparer = null)
{
    if (unsorted == null ||  unsorted.Count < 2)
    {
        return unsorted;
    }

    if (comparer == null)
    {
        comparer = Comparer<T>.Default;
    }

    IList<T> sorted = new List<T>();
    int middle = (int)unsorted.Count/2;
    Ilist<T> left = unsorted.GetRange(0, middle);
    IList<T> right = unsorted.GetRange(middle, unsorted.Count - middle);

    var sortLeft = Task<IList<T>>.Factory.StartNew(
        () => left.MergeSort(comparer));

    var sortRight = Task<IList<T>>.Factory.StartNew(
        () => right.MergeSort(comparer));

    left = sortLeft.Result;
    right = sortRight.Result;

    int leftPtr = 0;
    int rightPtr = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < left.Count + right.Count; i++)
    {
        if (leftPtr == left.Count)
        {
            sorted.Add(right[rightPtr]);
            rightPtr++;
        }
        else if (rightPtr == right.Count)
        {
            sorted.Add(left[leftPtr]);
            leftPtr++;
        }
        else if (comparer.Compare(left[leftPtr], right[rightPtr]) < 0)
        {
            sorted.Add(left[leftPtr]);
            leftPtr++;
        }
        else
        {
            sorted.Add(right[rightPtr]);
            rightPtr++;
        }
    }

    return sorted;
}

This code, will use the default IComparer<T> unless you pass your own.

As you can see this code self iterates on each half of the unsorted array, I've added some code using the Task TPL class to run those calls asynchronously on seperate threads.

You could use the code like this,

var strings = new List<string>
    {
        "cixymn", 
        "adfxij",
        "adxhxy",
        "abcdef",
        "iejfyq",
        "uqbzxo",
        "aaaaaa" 
    };

var sortedStrings = strings.MergeSort();          

If the default string comparer is not lexicographical enough for you, you could instantiate and pass your a selected StringComparer, perhaps like this,

var sortedStrings = strings.MergeSort(StringComparer.OrdinalIgnoreCase);

In the unlikely event that none of the StringComparers meet your requirements, you could write your own implementation of IComparer<string> and pass that to the MergeSort function instead.

In any case, it makes sense to keep the merge sort generic and resuable for all types and pass the specialization into the function.

share|improve this answer
1  
Hi Jodrell, I am trying to sort strings lexicographically (alphabetical order of words) by comparing characters from the left to the right. I don't think I can do so with the above –  DottoreM Aug 10 '12 at 9:04
1  
@DottoreM the merge sort algorithm would remain unchanged, the crux is how you do the left[leftPtr] < right[rightPtr] comparison. Does the default IEqualityComparer for string not meet your needs? msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/84787k22.aspx –  Jodrell Aug 10 '12 at 9:13
1  
Forgive me, you will need to use IComparer for this sort rather than IEqualityComparer, I will illustrate in my answer –  Jodrell Aug 10 '12 at 9:32
1  
@DottoreM, I've updated my answer to show you what I mean. –  Jodrell Aug 10 '12 at 9:51
1  
@DottoreM, I've added the multi-threading too. –  Jodrell Aug 10 '12 at 10:08

Here is a working solution. MergeSort is the most basic version, ThreadedMergeSort uses tasks and optimizes trivial cases. The simple version is about 30% slower than the .Sort() method (which is quicksort I think) on my machine, while the threaded version is about twice as fast.

    static List<T> MergeSort<T>(List<T> input) where T: IComparable
    {
        var length = input.Count;

        if (length < 2)
            return input;

        var left = MergeSort(input.GetRange(0, length / 2));
        var right = MergeSort(input.GetRange(length / 2, length - length / 2));
        var result = new List<T>();
        for (int leftIndex = 0, leftLength = left.Count, rightLength = right.Count, rightIndex = 0; leftIndex + rightIndex < length;)
        {
            if (rightIndex >= rightLength || leftIndex < leftLength && left[leftIndex].CompareTo(right[rightIndex]) <= 0)
                result.Add(left[leftIndex++]);
            else
                result.Add(right[rightIndex++]);
        }

        return result;
    }

    static List<T> ThreadedMergeSort<T>(List<T> input) where T : IComparable
    {
        var length = input.Count;

        if (length < 2)
            return input;

        // this next part can be commented out if you want a "pure" mergesort, but it
        // doesn't make sense to merge sort very short sublists.
        if (length < 10)
        {
            for (int i = 0; i < length - 1; i++)
                for (int j = i + 1; j < length; j++)
                    if (input[i].CompareTo(input[j]) > 0)
                    {
                        var tmp = input[i];
                        input[i] = input[j];
                        input[j] = tmp;
                    }
            return input;
        }

        List<T> left, right;
        if (length > 10000)
        {
            var taskLeft = Task<List<T>>.Factory.StartNew(() => { return ThreadedMergeSort(input.GetRange(0, length / 2)); });
            var taskRight = Task<List<T>>.Factory.StartNew(() => { return ThreadedMergeSort(input.GetRange(length / 2, length - length / 2)); });
            taskLeft.Wait();
            taskRight.Wait();
            left = taskLeft.Result;
            right = taskRight.Result;
        }
        else
        {
            left = ThreadedMergeSort(input.GetRange(0, length / 2));
            right = ThreadedMergeSort(input.GetRange(length / 2, length - length / 2));
        }
        var result = new List<T>();
        for (int leftIndex = 0, leftLength = left.Count, rightLength = right.Count, rightIndex = 0; leftIndex + rightIndex < length; )
        {
            if (rightIndex >= rightLength || leftIndex < leftLength && left[leftIndex].CompareTo(right[rightIndex]) <= 0)
                result.Add(left[leftIndex++]);
            else
                result.Add(right[rightIndex++]);
        }

        return result;
    }
share|improve this answer
    
This answer is certainly not written for performance. input.Where((str, index) => index < length / 2)).ToList() creates a new list and copies all the elements from input into it. This is completely unnecessary since ThreadedMergeSort return a new list anyway. –  Michael Graczyk Aug 10 '12 at 10:03
    
Also for fewer than 10 items you should do an insertion sort, not that. It doesn't "optimize" trivial cases. –  Michael Graczyk Aug 10 '12 at 10:10
    
If I replace that piece of code with insertion sort, it actually runs slower on my machine (about 10% slower at sorting 100 random 100000-string lists). You are right about the linq query though, I edited that out. –  svinja Aug 10 '12 at 11:31
    
The insertion sort I used: for (int i = 0;i<length;i++){var item=input[i];int itemIndex=i;while(itemIndex>0&&input[itemIndex-1].CompareTo(item)>0){input[itemI‌​ndex]=input[itemIndex - 1];itemIndex--;}input[itemIndex] = item;} Feel free to write a better one. –  svinja Aug 10 '12 at 11:42

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