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I call ISCC /DENABLE_SIGNING=1 MyFile.iss, and in MyFile.iss I have:

#if ENABLE_SIGNING == 1
SignedUninstaller=yes
SignTool=mysigntool
#endif

ISPP fails with an error exactly at the line with #if ENABLE_SIGNING == 1:

[ISPP] Operator not applicable to this operand type.

But if I've defined ENABLE_SIGNING in the MyFile.iss instead, it goes fine. This code passes without errors:

#define ENABLE_SIGNING 1

#if ENABLE_SIGNING == 1
SignedUninstaller=yes
SignTool=mysigntool
#endif

Edit

Also, there is another problem, when I use /DENABLE_SIGNING=0, testing #if ENABLE_SIGNING succeeds, while if I use #define ENABLE_SIGNING 0, the check fails (meaning evaluates to false), as it should.

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In this example, it's probably better to scrap the values and just check if it's defined using #ifdef. –  Deanna Aug 10 '12 at 14:34

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

From some tests I've ran right now it seems the command line interpreted preprocessor takes the define default values as strings. So when you modify your condition this way, it will work properly:

; just for case when you wouldn't run ISCC from command line
#ifndef ENABLE_SIGNING
  #define ENABLE_SIGNING "1"
#endif

[Setup]
AppName=My Program 1
AppVersion=1.5
DefaultDirName={pf}\My Program

#if ENABLE_SIGNING == "1"
  SignedUninstaller=yes
  SignTool=mysigntool
#endif
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