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I can not find out what is the correct behaviour of this program according to ISO pascal standard. I tried to read the ISO 7185 Standard document but did not find anything on this topic. What should be the result 4 or 24 ?

program Undetermined;
var
   n: Integer;

function fact: Integer;
begin
   fact := 1;
   if n > 1 then
   begin
      n := n - 1;
      fact := (n + 1) * fact
   end
end;

begin
   n := 4;
   writeln( fact )
end.

EDIT : I realised that there is a second problem in my example. So consider the new code :

program Undefined;
var
   n: Integer;

function power2: Integer;
begin
   power2 := 1;
   if n > 0 then
   begin
      n := n - 1;
      power2 := 2 * power2
   end
end;

begin
   n := 4;
   writeln( power2 )
end.

The result should be 16 or 2 (according to my compiler) ?

EDIT : thanks for the answer event if they did not solve my problem. I finally got the right answer on an other forum : the ISO-standard specify the behaviour I expected but the compiler I use (fpc) does not conform the standard on that point with the default settings.

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What do you think it should do? have you tried writing down what you would do following those instructions? – BugFinder Aug 10 '12 at 9:22
    
I don't see how your question is related to recursion. Isn't this simply a question about the order of evaluation in an expression? i.e. is (n+1) or fact evaluated first. – CodesInChaos Aug 10 '12 at 9:32
    
Sure, I think the result should be 24 since I think this is a recursive program. But this not the result given by the compiler ! So I want to know if there is a bug in the compiler or if the behaviour is not defined by the standard. – user1589721 Aug 10 '12 at 9:32
    
@user1589721 Why do you think recursion is relevant here? – CodesInChaos Aug 10 '12 at 9:44
    
Because fact is not a variable but a function. – user1589721 Aug 10 '12 at 9:49

There are two separate issues here:

  1. Does fact denote the result of the function, or a recursive call?
  2. If it does denote a recursive call, is the result 24 or implementation defined?

1. Does fact denote the result of the function, or a recursive call?

Since fact doesn't occur on the left side of an assignment, it doesn't correspond to the result of the function, so it should invoke the function recursively. The compiler treating fact and fact() differently in this context sounds like a bug.

The standard says:

Within an activation, an applied occurrence of a label or variable-identifier, or of a procedure-identifier or function-identifier local to the block of the activation, shall denote the corresponding program-point, variable, procedure, or function, respectively, of that activation; except that the function-identifier of an assignment-statement shall, within an activation of the function denoted by that function-identifier, denote the result of that activation.

2. If it does denote a recursive call, is the result 24 or implementation defined?

Even if you disregard the recursion related issue, and use fact(), you still can't expect to always get 24 as a result.

It boils down to: "Is (n+1) or fact() evaluated first in the expression (n + 1) * fact?

The order of evaluation is implementation defined in this case. This means that different implementations following the standard can give different results, and you can't expect 24 for all of them.

To quote the standard:

6.7.2 Operators

6.7.2.1 General


Table 3 | Dyadic arithmetic operations

...
* Multiplication
...


A factor, a term, or a simple-expression shall be designated an operand. The order of evaluation of the operands of a dyadic operator shall be implementation-dependent.

NOTE | This means, for example, that the operands may be evaluated in textual order, or in reverse order, or in parallel, or they may not both be evaluated.

share|improve this answer
    
It is realy on recursion because if I write fact := (n - 1) * fact(); the result given by the compiler is 24 ! – user1589721 Aug 10 '12 at 9:54

Free Pascal's ISO dialect mode is very young (1-2 years), as FPC generally is a Borland and not ISO oriented compiler.

The Mac Pascal mode is more tested, and is in general very ISO like. Compiling in macpascal mode will yield the "16" answer without ().

Probably ISO mode should do the same and not use the borland/delphi like return value is a pseudo variable. Please file a bug.

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