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I've made a switch case statement in C#, which involves giving the user a couple options to select from. I want it to run again (probably via a loop of some sort) if the user enters an invalid option. Please kindly help me out, I believe it's quite basic.

     static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            int a,b,ch;

            Console.WriteLine("Enter the value of a:");
            a = Convert.ToInt32(Console.ReadLine());   

            Console.WriteLine("Enter the value of b:");
            b = Convert.ToInt32(Console.ReadLine());
            Console.WriteLine("Enter your choice : Addition:0  Subtraction:1  Multiplication :2 :");
            ch = Convert.ToInt32(Console.ReadLine());
            switch(ch)
            {
                case 0: {
                    Console.WriteLine("Addition value is :{0}", a + b);
                    break;
                }
                case 1:
                    {
                        Console.WriteLine("Subtraction value is :{0}", a - b);
                        break;
                    }
                case 2:
                    {
                        Console.WriteLine("Multiplication value is :{0}", a * b);
                        break;
                    }
                default:
                    {
                        Console.WriteLine("Invalid choice ");
                        goto switch(ch); 

//please tell me what should i write here, it should go to the start of the switch case
                    }
                case 4:
                    {
                         continue; 

 //please tell me what should i write here.it should come out of the loop show the result
                    }       
                    }
              }
           }
    }
}
share|improve this question
14  
You don't have a loop to come out of... –  Jon Skeet Aug 10 '12 at 10:17
    
What loop are you talking about ? –  h1ghfive Aug 10 '12 at 10:20
1  
Why are you using a switch statement as a loop? Why do you use goto at all? Why are you not using a regular loop? –  Oded Aug 10 '12 at 10:21
1  
It will come out automatically, without any additional code form your side. –  Mohammed ElSayed Aug 10 '12 at 10:22
3  
This is a terrible way to code what you actually want. I would start again to be honest. –  CSharpened Aug 10 '12 at 10:22

8 Answers 8

So the primary issue here is that you need a while loop to stay in, and optionally break from. Some other items of interest here though are that you really need to be validating Type input from the user a lot better. For example, these two lines:

Console.WriteLine("Enter the value of a:"); 
a = Convert.ToInt32(Console.ReadLine());    

Should really be replaced with:

while (true)
{    
    Console.WriteLine("Enter the value of a:"); 
    if (Int32.TryParse(Console.ReadLine(), out a))
    {
        break;
    }
}

Likewise, you have three other places you're doing the same thing, so I would recommend building a method and calling it - it might look like this.

private static int GetIntegerInput(string prompt)
{
    int result;
    Console.WriteLine();

    while (true)
    {
        // THIS SHOULD OVERWRITE THE SAME PROMPT EVERY TIME
        Console.Write(prompt); 
        if (Int32.TryParse(Console.ReadLine(), out result))
        {
            break;
        }
    }
    return result;
}

And then you would call it like this:

a = GetIntegerInput("Enter the value of a:");

And so now that can be reused for all three blocks of a, b, and ch. Here is a complete example that includes the calls to the methods to protect against typed input.

static void Main(string[] args) 
{ 
    int a,b,ch; 

    while (ch != 4)
    { 
        // GET READY TO ASK THE USER AGAIN
        Console.Clear();

        a = GetIntegerInput("Enter the value of a:");
        b = GetIntegerInput("Enter the value of b:");
        ch = GetIntegerInput("Enter your choice : Addition:0  Subtraction:1  Multiplication :2 :");

        switch(ch) 
        { 
            case 0:
            { 
                Console.WriteLine("Addition value is :{0}", a + b); 
                break; 
            } 
            case 1: 
            { 
                Console.WriteLine("Subtraction value is :{0}", a - b); 
                break; 
            } 
            case 2: 
            { 
                Console.WriteLine("Multiplication value is :{0}", a * b); 
                break; 
            } 
            default: 
            { 
                Console.WriteLine("Invalid choice "); 

                // THIS GOES TO THE BEGINNING OF THE LOOP
                // SO THAT YOU CAN ASK THE USER AGAIN FOR
                // MORE CORRECT INPUT
                continue;
            }
        }

        // THIS WILL BREAK YOU OUT OF THE LOOP ON A GOOD ENTRY
        break;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Might be worth pointing out that continue means "go back to the start of the loop". –  Rawling Aug 10 '12 at 10:24
    
@Rawling - good point, I'll edit the answer. –  Michael Perrenoud Aug 10 '12 at 10:26
    
Although to be fair he did try to use continue as a break-out-of-loop command in the question :) –  Rawling Aug 10 '12 at 10:28
    
This might work but while(true) is the worst of bad practices –  Alex Aug 10 '12 at 10:29
    
@Alex I hope you mean, except for using goto :P –  Rawling Aug 10 '12 at 10:33

you haven't got a loop int ch will default to 0. therefore you only ever go into case 0. you need to include goto case 1;

look at http://www.dotnetperls.com/switch for more info

share|improve this answer

Instead of giving the users the ability to enter something incorrect then running through it all again until they get it right, why not give them a strict set of choices? See code below:

using System;

public static class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        const int addition = 0;
        const int subtraction = 1;
        const int multiplication = 2;

        var a = GetInt32("Enter the value of a:");  
        var b = GetInt32("Enter the value of b:");

choose:        
        var choice = GetInt32(string.Format(@"Enter your choice:
            {0}: Addition
            {1}: Subtraction
            {2}: Multiplication", addition, subtraction, multiplication));  

        switch(choice)
        {
            case addition:
                {
                    Console.WriteLine("Addition value is :{0}", a + b);
                    break;
                }
            case subtraction:
                {
                    Console.WriteLine("Subtraction value is :{0}", a - b);
                    break;
                }
            case multiplication:
                {
                    Console.WriteLine("Multiplication value is :{0}", a * b);
                    break;
                }
            default:
                {
                    Console.WriteLine("Invalid choice ");
                    goto choose; 
                }
        }
    }

    private static int GetInt32(string prompt)
    {
        while(true)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(prompt);
            var line = Console.ReadLine();
            int result;
            if(int.TryParse(line, out result))
                return result;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Though this isn't actually what the asker is looking for, this is a much better solution to the problem. –  andrewb Aug 10 '12 at 10:36
    
Why do you suggest to the OP to keep the goto? He might actually start to believe that it's an ok way to do things! –  Øyvind Bråthen Aug 10 '12 at 10:37
    
I do think goto is an ok way to do things sometimes, such as this time. –  deerchao Aug 10 '12 at 10:40

Your code is easily fixed. You have no loop to begin with!

int a = 0, b = 0, ch = -1; //always initialize your variables.

do 
    Console.WriteLine("Enter the value of a:");
while(!int.TryParse(Console.ReadLine(), out a));

do 
    Console.WriteLine("Enter the value of b:");
while(!int.TryParse(Console.ReadLine(), out b));

while (ch != 4) //starts at -1 so it will surely enter the loop
{
    //Will keep asking until user enters "4", then it will exit
    do
        Console.WriteLine("Enter your choice : Addition:0  Subtraction:1  Multiplication :2 :");
    while(!int.TryParse(Console.ReadLine(), out ch));

    switch (ch)
    {
        case 0:
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Addition value is :{0}", a + b);

            } break;
        case 1:
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Subtraction value is :{0}", a - b);

            } break;
        case 2:
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Multiplication value is :{0}", a * b);

            } break;
        // case 4 is not needed, it will exit from the loop anyway
        default:
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Invalid choice");
            } break;
    }
}

EDIT: I added a rough error-checking to not let the code blow up if user inputs 'A' instead of a number.

share|improve this answer
    
ACtually, it starts at 1, not -1 ;) –  Øyvind Bråthen Aug 10 '12 at 10:34
    
Fixed! Not that it really matters, as long as it's not 4 it's alright –  Alex Aug 10 '12 at 10:39
    
It's also worth noting that it would have broken badly is user entered 'A' for example. Fixed again. –  Alex Aug 10 '12 at 10:42
int i = 0;
while(i == 0)
{
    i == 1; // this will make it exit the loop unless case 4 happens   
    switch(ch)
    {
        case 0: {
            Console.WriteLine("Addition value is :{0}", a + b);
            break;
        }
        ...
        case 4 {
            i == 0;
            break;
        }
     }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
I would use bool value and give it more valuable name... –  JleruOHeP Aug 10 '12 at 10:22
    
@JleruOHeP Agree. Using 1's and 0's for boolean values is a very C thing to do.. –  Alexander R Aug 10 '12 at 10:24
    
MySwitch: Console.WriteLine("Enter your choice : Addition:0 Subtraction:1 Multiplication :2 :"); ch = Convert.ToInt32(Console.ReadLine()); –  user1390883 Aug 10 '12 at 10:34
    
I agree with @JleruOHeP it's an old habit, from a time when bool and int used the same amount of memory. It's probably better to use bool. –  Garrett Fogerlie Aug 10 '12 at 10:34
    
that made the difference thank you –  user1390883 Aug 10 '12 at 10:35
int ch = -1;
while(ch!= 0 && ch!= 1 && ch!=2)
    ch = Convert.ToInt32(Console.ReadLine());
switch(ch)   //correct input
share|improve this answer
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        int firstValue, secondValue, arithmeticOperation;
    RestartProgram:
        Console.WriteLine("Enter the value of a:");
        firstValue = Convert.ToInt32(Console.ReadLine());

        Console.WriteLine("Enter the value of b:");
        secondValue = Convert.ToInt32(Console.ReadLine());
        Console.WriteLine("Enter your choice : Addition:0  Subtraction:1  Multiplication :2 :");

        arithmeticOperation = Convert.ToInt32(Console.ReadLine());
        switch (arithmeticOperation)
        {
            case 0:
                {
                    Console.WriteLine("Addition value is :{0}", firstValue + secondValue);
                    break;
                }
            case 1:
                {
                    Console.WriteLine("Subtraction value is :{0}", firstValue - secondValue);
                    break;
                }
            case 2:
                {
                    Console.WriteLine("Multiplication value is :{0}", firstValue * secondValue);
                    break;
                }
            default:
                {
                    Console.WriteLine("Invalid choice ");
                    goto RestartProgram;
                }
        }

        Console.ReadLine();
    }

Is this what you are finding?

share|improve this answer
1  
I knew I would find a goto somewhere in this thread, I'm surprised I had to scroll down to far to find it. –  user989056 Aug 10 '12 at 10:34
    
Are you really suggesting that he keeps the goto instead of using a proper loop here? –  Øyvind Bråthen Aug 10 '12 at 10:35
    
glad you found it. This would be your answer right? –  Jsinh Aug 10 '12 at 10:44
    
@ØyvindKnobloch-Bråthen Logically I won't suggest that but that is not what he is asking for. He wants a way to go back to the start using goto keyword. That is what I interpret in the above question and gave an answer for the same. –  Jsinh Aug 10 '12 at 10:46
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        int a, b, ch;

        Console.WriteLine("Enter the value of a:");
        a = Convert.ToInt32(Console.ReadLine());

        Console.WriteLine("Enter the value of b:");
        b = Convert.ToInt32(Console.ReadLine());
        start:
        Console.WriteLine("Enter your choice : Addition:0  Subtraction:1  Multiplication :2 :");

        ch = Convert.ToInt32(Console.ReadLine());

        switch (ch)
        {
            case 0: Console.WriteLine("Addition value is :{0}", a + b);
                break;

            case 1: Console.WriteLine("Subtraction value is :{0}", a - b);
                break;

            case 2: Console.WriteLine("Multiplication value is :{0}", a * b);
                break;

            default: Console.WriteLine("Invalid choice ");
                ch = 0;
                goto start;
        }
    }
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