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I am importing some number of records with multiple string fields from an old db to a new db. It seems to be very slow and I suspect it's because I do this:

foreach (var oldObj in oldDB)
{
    NewObject newObj = new NewObject();
    newObj.Name = oldObj.Name.Trim().Replace('^', 'Č').Replace('@', 'Ž').Replace('[', 'Š')
        .Replace(']', 'Ć').Replace('`', 'ž').Replace('}', 'ć')
        .Replace('~', 'č').Replace('{', 'š').Replace('\\', 'Đ');
    newObj.Surname = oldObj.Surname.Trim().Replace('^', 'Č').Replace('@', 'Ž').Replace('[', 'Š')
        .Replace(']', 'Ć').Replace('`', 'ž').Replace('}', 'ć')
        .Replace('~', 'č').Replace('{', 'š').Replace('\\', 'Đ');
    newObj.Address = oldObj.Address.Trim().Replace('^', 'Č').Replace('@', 'Ž').Replace('[', 'Š')
        .Replace(']', 'Ć').Replace('`', 'ž').Replace('}', 'ć')
        .Replace('~', 'č').Replace('{', 'š').Replace('\\', 'Đ');
    newObj.Note = oldObj.Note.Trim().Replace('^', 'Č').Replace('@', 'Ž').Replace('[', 'Š')
        .Replace(']', 'Ć').Replace('`', 'ž').Replace('}', 'ć')
        .Replace('~', 'č').Replace('{', 'š').Replace('\\', 'Đ');
    /*
    ... some processing ...
    */
}

Now, I have read some posts and articles through the Net where I have seen many different thoughts about this. Some say it's better if I'd do regex with MatchEvaluator, some say it's the best to leave it as is.

While it's possible that it'd be easier for me to just do a benchmark case for myself, I decided to ask a question here in case someone else has been wondering about the same question, or in case someone knows in advance.

So what is the fastest way to do this in C#?

EDIT

I have posted the benchmark here. At the first sight it looks like Richard's way might be the fastest. However, his way, nor Marc's, would do anything because of the wrong Regex pattern. After correcting the pattern from

@"\^@\[\]`\}~\{\\" 

to

@"\^|@|\[|\]|`|\}|~|\{|\\" 

it appears as if the old way with chained .Replace() calls is the fastest after all

share|improve this question
    
I would suggest to leave it as is. Maybe try a parrallel foreach ? –  h1ghfive Aug 10 '12 at 10:23
5  
You suspect that's the reason? You should know. You need to profile the application in order to fine the bottleneck - don't guess. –  Oded Aug 10 '12 at 10:24
    
I once asked this and accepted this but I'm not sure if that's what you're looking for. –  Şafak Gür Aug 10 '12 at 10:26
1  
@Oded whether I suspect or know is not a question here, the question is how to yield better performance while replacing multiple characters in a string. It is irrelevant, you should assume the /* ... some processing ... */ part of the sample code is surely not the bottleneck considering I asked the question in this form. Thanks for the constructive comment though. –  Dejan Janjušević Aug 10 '12 at 10:36
1  
My point is that if you don't have the data, you might be doing some micro optimizations, where there is a chance of macro optimizations. Suspecting that a piece of code is the problem doesn't mean it is - you may be focusing your efforts on the wrong problem, that's all. –  Oded Aug 10 '12 at 10:39
show 2 more comments

6 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Thanks for your inputs guys. I wrote a quick and dirty benchmark to test your inputs. I have tested parsing 4 strings with 500.000 iterations and have done 4 passes. The result is as follows:

*** Pass 1
Old (Chained String.Replace()) way completed in 814 ms
logicnp (ToCharArray) way completed in 916 ms
oleksii (StringBuilder) way completed in 943 ms
André Christoffer Andersen (Lambda w/ Aggregate) way completed in 2551 ms
Richard (Regex w/ MatchEvaluator) way completed in 215 ms
Marc Gravell (Static Regex) way completed in 1008 ms

*** Pass 2
Old (Chained String.Replace()) way completed in 786 ms
logicnp (ToCharArray) way completed in 920 ms
oleksii (StringBuilder) way completed in 905 ms
André Christoffer Andersen (Lambda w/ Aggregate) way completed in 2515 ms
Richard (Regex w/ MatchEvaluator) way completed in 217 ms
Marc Gravell (Static Regex) way completed in 1025 ms

*** Pass 3
Old (Chained String.Replace()) way completed in 775 ms
logicnp (ToCharArray) way completed in 903 ms
oleksii (StringBuilder) way completed in 931 ms
André Christoffer Andersen (Lambda w/ Aggregate) way completed in 2529 ms
Richard (Regex w/ MatchEvaluator) way completed in 214 ms
Marc Gravell (Static Regex) way completed in 1022 ms

*** Pass 4
Old (Chained String.Replace()) way completed in 799 ms
logicnp (ToCharArray) way completed in 908 ms
oleksii (StringBuilder) way completed in 938 ms
André Christoffer Andersen (Lambda w/ Aggregate) way completed in 2592 ms
Richard (Regex w/ MatchEvaluator) way completed in 225 ms
Marc Gravell (Static Regex) way completed in 1050 ms

The code for this benchmark is below. Please review the code and confirm that @Richard has got the fastest way. Note that I haven't checked if outputs were correct, I assumed they were.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Diagnostics;
using System.Text.RegularExpressions;

namespace StringReplaceTest
{
    class Program
    {
        static string test1 = "A^@[BCD";
        static string test2 = "E]FGH\\";
        static string test3 = "ijk`l}m";
        static string test4 = "nopq~{r";

        static readonly Dictionary<char, string> repl =
            new Dictionary<char, string> 
            { 
                {'^', "Č"}, {'@', "Ž"}, {'[', "Š"}, {']', "Ć"}, {'`', "ž"}, {'}', "ć"}, {'~', "č"}, {'{', "š"}, {'\\', "Đ"} 
            };

        static readonly Regex replaceRegex;

        static Program() // static initializer 
        {
            StringBuilder pattern = new StringBuilder().Append('[');
            foreach (var key in repl.Keys)
                pattern.Append(Regex.Escape(key.ToString()));
            pattern.Append(']');
            replaceRegex = new Regex(pattern.ToString(), RegexOptions.Compiled);
        }

        public static string Sanitize(string input)
        {
            return replaceRegex.Replace(input, match =>
            {
                return repl[match.Value[0]];
            });
        } 

        static string DoGeneralReplace(string input) 
        { 
            var sb = new StringBuilder(input);
            return sb.Replace('^', 'Č').Replace('@', 'Ž').Replace('[', 'Š').Replace(']', 'Ć').Replace('`', 'ž').Replace('}', 'ć').Replace('~', 'č').Replace('{', 'š').Replace('\\', 'Đ').ToString(); 
        }

        //Method for replacing chars with a mapping 
        static string Replace(string input, IDictionary<char, char> replacementMap)
        {
            return replacementMap.Keys
                .Aggregate(input, (current, oldChar)
                    => current.Replace(oldChar, replacementMap[oldChar]));
        } 

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            for (int i = 1; i < 5; i++)
                DoIt(i);
        }

        static void DoIt(int n)
        {
            Stopwatch sw = new Stopwatch();
            int idx = 0;

            Console.WriteLine("*** Pass " + n.ToString());
            // old way
            sw.Start();
            for (idx = 0; idx < 500000; idx++)
            {
                string result1 = test1.Replace('^', 'Č').Replace('@', 'Ž').Replace('[', 'Š').Replace(']', 'Ć').Replace('`', 'ž').Replace('}', 'ć').Replace('~', 'č').Replace('{', 'š').Replace('\\', 'Đ');
                string result2 = test2.Replace('^', 'Č').Replace('@', 'Ž').Replace('[', 'Š').Replace(']', 'Ć').Replace('`', 'ž').Replace('}', 'ć').Replace('~', 'č').Replace('{', 'š').Replace('\\', 'Đ');
                string result3 = test3.Replace('^', 'Č').Replace('@', 'Ž').Replace('[', 'Š').Replace(']', 'Ć').Replace('`', 'ž').Replace('}', 'ć').Replace('~', 'č').Replace('{', 'š').Replace('\\', 'Đ');
                string result4 = test4.Replace('^', 'Č').Replace('@', 'Ž').Replace('[', 'Š').Replace(']', 'Ć').Replace('`', 'ž').Replace('}', 'ć').Replace('~', 'č').Replace('{', 'š').Replace('\\', 'Đ');
            }
            sw.Stop();
            Console.WriteLine("Old (Chained String.Replace()) way completed in " + sw.ElapsedMilliseconds.ToString() + " ms");

            Dictionary<char, char> replacements = new Dictionary<char, char>();
            replacements.Add('^', 'Č');
            replacements.Add('@', 'Ž');
            replacements.Add('[', 'Š');
            replacements.Add(']', 'Ć');
            replacements.Add('`', 'ž');
            replacements.Add('}', 'ć');
            replacements.Add('~', 'č');
            replacements.Add('{', 'š');
            replacements.Add('\\', 'Đ');

            // logicnp way
            sw.Reset();
            sw.Start();
            for (idx = 0; idx < 500000; idx++)
            {
                char[] charArray1 = test1.ToCharArray();
                for (int i = 0; i < charArray1.Length; i++)
                {
                    char newChar;
                    if (replacements.TryGetValue(test1[i], out newChar))
                        charArray1[i] = newChar;
                }
                string result1 = new string(charArray1);

                char[] charArray2 = test2.ToCharArray();
                for (int i = 0; i < charArray2.Length; i++)
                {
                    char newChar;
                    if (replacements.TryGetValue(test2[i], out newChar))
                        charArray2[i] = newChar;
                }
                string result2 = new string(charArray2);

                char[] charArray3 = test3.ToCharArray();
                for (int i = 0; i < charArray3.Length; i++)
                {
                    char newChar;
                    if (replacements.TryGetValue(test3[i], out newChar))
                        charArray3[i] = newChar;
                }
                string result3 = new string(charArray3);

                char[] charArray4 = test4.ToCharArray();
                for (int i = 0; i < charArray4.Length; i++)
                {
                    char newChar;
                    if (replacements.TryGetValue(test4[i], out newChar))
                        charArray4[i] = newChar;
                }
                string result4 = new string(charArray4);
            }
            sw.Stop();
            Console.WriteLine("logicnp (ToCharArray) way completed in " + sw.ElapsedMilliseconds.ToString() + " ms");

            // oleksii way
            sw.Reset();
            sw.Start();
            for (idx = 0; idx < 500000; idx++)
            {
                string result1 = DoGeneralReplace(test1);
                string result2 = DoGeneralReplace(test2);
                string result3 = DoGeneralReplace(test3);
                string result4 = DoGeneralReplace(test4);
            }
            sw.Stop();
            Console.WriteLine("oleksii (StringBuilder) way completed in " + sw.ElapsedMilliseconds.ToString() + " ms");

            // André Christoffer Andersen way
            sw.Reset();
            sw.Start();
            for (idx = 0; idx < 500000; idx++)
            {
                string result1 = Replace(test1, replacements);
                string result2 = Replace(test2, replacements);
                string result3 = Replace(test3, replacements);
                string result4 = Replace(test4, replacements);
            }
            sw.Stop();
            Console.WriteLine("André Christoffer Andersen (Lambda w/ Aggregate) way completed in " + sw.ElapsedMilliseconds.ToString() + " ms");

            // Richard way
            sw.Reset();
            sw.Start();
            Regex reg = new Regex(@"\^@\[\]`\}~\{\\");
            MatchEvaluator eval = match =>
            {
                switch (match.Value)
                {
                    case "^": return "Č";
                    case "@": return "Ž";
                    case "[": return "Š";
                    case "]": return "Ć";
                    case "`": return "ž";
                    case "}": return "ć";
                    case "~": return "č";
                    case "{": return "š";
                    case "\\": return "Đ";
                    default: throw new Exception("Unexpected match!");
                }
            };
            for (idx = 0; idx < 500000; idx++)
            {
                string result1 = reg.Replace(test1, eval);
                string result2 = reg.Replace(test2, eval);
                string result3 = reg.Replace(test3, eval);
                string result4 = reg.Replace(test4, eval);
            }
            sw.Stop();
            Console.WriteLine("Richard (Regex w/ MatchEvaluator) way completed in " + sw.ElapsedMilliseconds.ToString() + " ms");

            // Marc Gravell way
            sw.Reset();
            sw.Start();
            for (idx = 0; idx < 500000; idx++)
            {
                string result1 = Sanitize(test1);
                string result2 = Sanitize(test2);
                string result3 = Sanitize(test3);
                string result4 = Sanitize(test4);
            }
            sw.Stop();
            Console.WriteLine("Marc Gravell (Static Regex) way completed in " + sw.ElapsedMilliseconds.ToString() + " ms\n");
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
He he, this is awesome! –  oleksii Aug 10 '12 at 12:01
1  
It's not that surprising that Regex is faster. It's built to search strings with ridiculous efficiency. Always remember, Law of the instrument is bad - leverage the technologies that are built for what you're trying to do so don't be afraid to use Regex. C# isn't good at everything just because there's an API for it. Good question and good benchmarks @Dejan. –  Michael Perrenoud Aug 10 '12 at 12:38
1  
I'd also add one thing too - your test strings are very short. While this may be the case for your real data (in which case your benchmarking is just fine and spot on), it skews the results for longer strings, with different amounts of characters to replace etc. I suspect this is responsible for the relatively good performance of string.Replace - it does create the string over and over again (though only if something changes), but both the loop and the string result is very small, so it doesn't cost much. The difference would be much more pronounced on long strings. –  Luaan Feb 7 at 9:00
1  
I've tested with larger strings with more replacements, and the results are quite predictable, but they do change some things. First, on larger strings, StringBuilder starts getting faster than String (the cost of creating the SB itself starts being offset by the savings in repeated creation of new strings). In the opposite way, Richard's solution is getting better and better, because it only depends on the length of the string linearly, not to mention that it adds much less memory pressure compared to string.Replace. –  Luaan Feb 7 at 9:03
1  
I think the Regex method is the fastest because the pattern is missing '[' at the beginning of the string and a ']' at the end of the string. With the sample shown, no replacement is done because we have no match! I think the huge difference in time between the two regex methods, can simply explained by that. –  Serge Weinstock Feb 11 at 16:49
show 1 more comment

the fastest way

The only way is to compare the performance yourself. Try as in the Q, using StringBuilder and also Regex.Replace.

But micro-benchmarks don't consider the scope of the whole system. If this method is only a small fraction of the overall system its performance probably doesn't matter to the overall application's performance.

Some notes:

  1. Using String as above (I assume) will create lots of intermediate strings: more work for the GC. But it is simple.
  2. Using StringBuilder allows the same underlying data to be modified with each replace. This creates less garbage. It is almost as simple as using String.
  3. Using a regex is most complex (because you need to have code to work out the replacement), but allows a single expression. I would expect this to be slower unless the list of replacements is very large and replacements are rare in the input string (ie. most replace method calls replace nothing, just costing a search through the string).

I expect #2 would be slightly quicker over repeated use (thousands of times) due to less GC load.

For the regex approach you need something like:

newObj.Name = Regex.Replace(oldObj.Name.Trim(), @"[@^\[\]`}~{\\]", match => {
  switch (match.Value) {
    case "^": return "Č";
    case "@": return "Ž";
    case "[": return "Š";
    case "]": return "Ć";
    case "`": return "ž";
    case "}": return "ć";
    case "~": return "č";
    case "{": return "š";
    case "\\": return "Đ";
    default: throw new Exception("Unexpected match!");
  }
});

This could be done in a reusable way by parameterising with a Dictionary<char,char> to hold the replacements and reusable MatchEvaluator.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer. Please take a look at the benchmark I posted as another answer. –  Dejan Janjušević Aug 10 '12 at 11:47
    
@DejanJanjušević oops on the regex typo... I knew I needed a character class (correcting). –  Richard Aug 10 '12 at 14:13
    
However when I fixed the typo the result was poor... even slower than Marc's static regex. –  Dejan Janjušević Aug 10 '12 at 18:46
    
@DejanJanjušević Worth noting the regex engine caches the last few (15 IIRC) regexes passed to the static methods, so in this test I wouldn't expect to see any difference in explicitly creating a Regex instance (only the first use of the static method will be slower for the compile). –  Richard Aug 11 '12 at 10:58
add comment

One possible solution is to use a StringBuilder class for this, because it is much more memory efficient than String.Replace.

You can first refactor the code to a single method

public string DoGeneralReplace(string input)
{
    var sb = new StringBuilder(input);
    sb.Replace("^", "Č")
      .Replace("@", "Ž") ...;
}


//usage
foreach (var oldObj in oldDB)
{
    NewObject newObj = new NewObject();
    newObj.Name = DoGeneralReplace(oldObj.Name);
    ...
}

The problem with String.Replace is that for every call run-time creates a new object, which is really inefficient.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer. Please take a look at the benchmark I posted as another answer. –  Dejan Janjušević Aug 10 '12 at 11:48
add comment

Try this:

Dictionary<char, char> replacements = new Dictionary<char, char>();
// populate replacements

string str = "mystring";
char []charArray = str.ToCharArray();

for (int i = 0; i < charArray.Length; i++)
{
    char newChar;
    if (replacements.TryGetValue(str[i], out newChar))
    charArray[i] = newChar;
}

string newStr = new string(charArray);
share|improve this answer
    
+1 I will only try to add an IndexOfAny to avoid loops on string when not needed –  Steve Aug 10 '12 at 10:34
    
@Steve - IndexOfAny will internally use a loop too. There is no way to avoid a single loop for this. –  logicnp Aug 10 '12 at 10:38
    
Thanks for your answer. Please take a look at the benchmark I posted as another answer. –  Dejan Janjušević Aug 10 '12 at 11:47
    
@logicnp True, but IndexOfAny is incredibly fast - if it's relatively common that the string doesn't have anything to replace, it could mean significant savings (including completely removing the creation of a new char[] - not a large cost, but still significant in the scope of things). Note that both ToCharArray and the later new string(charArray) copy the char data of the string and allocate the memory required. –  Luaan Feb 7 at 9:06
add comment

Well, I would try doing something like:

    static readonly Dictionary<char, string> replacements =
       new Dictionary<char, string>
    {
        {']',"Ć"}, {'~', "č"} // etc
    };
    static readonly Regex replaceRegex;
    static YourUtilityType() // static initializer
    {
        StringBuilder pattern = new StringBuilder().Append('[');
        foreach(var key in replacements.Keys)
            pattern.Append(Regex.Escape(key.ToString()));
        pattern.Append(']');
        replaceRegex = new Regex(pattern.ToString(), RegexOptions.Compiled);
    }
    public static string Sanitize(string input)
    {
        return replaceRegex.Replace(input, match =>
        {
            return replacements[match.Value[0]];
        });
    }

This has a single place to maintain (at the top), and builds a pre-compiled Regex to handle the replacements. All the overhead is done only one (hence static).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer. Please take a look at the benchmark I posted as another answer. –  Dejan Janjušević Aug 10 '12 at 11:47
add comment

You could use lambda expressions for this using Aggregate on a char map:

  //Method for replacing chars with a mapping
  static string Replace(string input, IDictionary<char, char> replacementMap) {
      return replacementMap.Keys
          .Aggregate(input, (current, oldChar) 
              => current.Replace(oldChar, replacementMap[oldChar]));
  }

You can run this as follows:

  private static void Main(string[] args) {
      //Char to char map using <oldChar, newChar>
      var charMap = new Dictionary<char, char>();
      charMap.Add('-', 'D'); charMap.Add('|', 'P'); charMap.Add('@', 'A');

      //Your input string
      string myString = "asgjk--@dfsg||jshd--f@jgsld-kj|rhgunfh-@-nsdflngs";

      //Your own replacement method
      myString = Replace(myString, charMap);

      //out: myString = "asgjkDDAdfsgPPjshdDDfAjgsldDkjPrhgunfhDADnsdflngs"
  }
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer. Please take a look at the benchmark I posted as another answer. –  Dejan Janjušević Aug 10 '12 at 11:48
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