Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Here is an example which creates a point as p=Point(x, y). Assume that I have some array ppp=(x, y) where x and y are numbers and I want to make it of class Point but in the way: p=Point(ppp). I can do either one or another way but not both simultaneously. Is it possible to have both ways?

share|improve this question
    
The proposed solution does not work for me. I have: def __init__(self, x, y = None, z = None): if y is not None and z is not None: self.x, self.y, self.z = x, y, z elif y is not None or z is not None: raise TypeError('Instance may have only 1 or 3 arguments, got 2') else: self.x, self.y, self.z = x Then I make: ppp = Point(p), where p = [0.0, 0.0, 0.0], and I got: __new__() takes exactly 4 arguments (2 given). It does not matter what are the numbers inside. –  Alexandr Aug 10 '12 at 12:41
    
The solution of Karol Nowak works. –  Alexandr Aug 10 '12 at 12:42

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you know that you have a tuple/list while creating the instance, you can do: p = Point(*ppp), where ppp is the tuple.

share|improve this answer
    
it does not work for list –  Alexandr Aug 10 '12 at 11:20
1  
It should: >>> class Point(object): ... def init__(self, x, y): ... self.x = x ... self.y = y ... >>> coords = [1, 2] >>> p = Point(*coords) >>> p <__main.Point object at 0x7ff4a6ec> >>> p.x, p.y (1, 2) –  Karol Nowak Aug 10 '12 at 12:08
    
Really, it works! Thank you. –  Alexandr Aug 10 '12 at 12:37
    
What does the star mean? –  Alexandr Aug 10 '12 at 13:02
1  
It means "unpack the list/tuple into multiple arguments". And if you have a dict d, you can use **d to unpack it into keyword arguments. –  Karol Nowak Aug 10 '12 at 19:04

There are two different ways to acquire the result, the first is to analyse arguments that you pass to __init__ and in dependence of their quantity and type - choose a decision what are you using to instantiate class.

class Point(object):

    x = 0
    y = 0

    def __init__(self, x, y=None):
       if y is None:
           self.x, self.y = x, x
       else:
           self.x, self.y = x, y

The other decision is to use classmethods as instantiators:

class Point(object):

    x = 0
    y = 0

    @classmethod
    def from_coords(cls, x, y):
       inst = cls()
       inst.x = x
       inst.y = y
       return inst

    @classmethod
    def from_string(cls, x):
       inst = cls()
       inst.x, inst.y = x, x
       return inst

p1 = Point.from_string('1.2 4.6')
p2 = Point.from_coords(1.2, 4.6)
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your answer. I understand what you mean, and I considered this way. But I did not want to create too many methods, and then call them every time I need to make a Point. The first way is better for me. –  Alexandr Aug 10 '12 at 10:58
    
The second method is much cleaner. Branching to determine type identity just feels wrong. –  g33kz0r Sep 20 '12 at 18:47

Yes:

class Point(object):
    def __init__(self, x, y=None):
        if y is not None:
            self.x, self.y = x, y
        else:
            self.x, self.y = x

    def __str__(self):
        return "{}, {}".format(self.x, self.y)

print Point(1,2)
# 1, 2
print Point((1,2))
# 1, 2
share|improve this answer
2  
This won't work if y==0. You should use if y is not None, I think. –  DSM Aug 10 '12 at 11:08
class Point:
    def __init__(self, x, y=None):
        if isinstance(x, tuple):
            self.x, self.y = x
         else:
            self.x = x
            self.y = y
share|improve this answer
    
does it work only if the array is tuple? What if I have a list? The second answer is probably better. –  Alexandr Aug 10 '12 at 10:55

I would guess that your looking for a way to overload your constructor, as is common in statically typed languages such as C++ and Java.

This is not possible in Python. What you can do is provide different keyword argument combinations, something like:

class Point(object):
  def __init__(self, x=None, y=None, r=None, t=None):
    if x is not None and y is not None:
      self.x = x
      self.y = y
    elif r is not None and t is not None:
      # set cartesian coordinates from polar ones

Which you would then use as:

p1 = Point(x=1, y=2)
p2 = Point(r=1, t=3.14)
share|improve this answer
    
It is possible, but it's hacky ;). stackoverflow.com/a/11379721/1142167 –  Joel Cornett Aug 10 '12 at 10:59
    
That is an interesting application. –  Alexandr Aug 10 '12 at 11:01

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.