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I have a Model PromoCode which has a .generate! method, that calls .generate which generates a String using SecureRandom.hex(5) and saves it to the database:

class PromoCode < ActiveRecord::Base
  class << self
    def generate 
      SecureRandom.hex 5
    end

    def generate!
      return create! code: generate
    end
  end
end

Now I want to write a spec that test the uniqueness of the generated string. The .generate method should be called as long as a non existent PromoCode has been generated.

I'm not sure how to do this since I can't really stub out the .generate method to return fixed values (because then it would be stuck in an infinite loop).

This is the passing spec for the model so far:

describe PromoCode do
  describe ".generate" do
    it "should return a string with a length of 10" do
      code = PromoCode.generate
      code.should be_a String
      code.length.should eql 10
    end
  end

  describe ".generate!" do
    it "generates and returns a promocode" do
      expect {
        @promo = PromoCode.generate!
      }.to change { PromoCode.count }.from(0).to(1)

      @promo.code.should_not be_nil
      @promo.code.length.should eql 10
    end

    it "generates a uniq promocode" do
    end
  end
end

Any directions appreciated.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Rspec's and_return method allows you to specify multiple return values that will be cycled through

For example you could write

PromoCode.stub(:generate).and_return('badcode1', 'badcode2', 'goodcode')

Which will cause the first call to generate to return 'badcode1', the second 'badcode2' etc... You can then check that the returned promocode was created with the correct code.

If you want to be race condition proof you'll want a database uniqueness constraint, so your code might actually want to be

def generate!
   create!(...)
rescue ActiveRecord::RecordNotUnique
  retry
end

In your spec you would stub the create! method to raise the first time but return a value the second time

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Whoa, didn't know about that. And also the implementation is even way more elegant than what I had in mind (using a loop and find_by_code). Thanks a lot! –  noxoc Aug 10 '12 at 13:29

And what about something like: create a PromoCode, save the result, and try to create a new PromoCode with the code of the previous PromoCode object:

it "should reject duplicate promocode" do
  @promo = PromoCode.generate!
  duplicate_promo = PromoCode.new(:code => @promo.code)
  duplicate_promo.should_not be_valid
end

Also, this is model level, I am assuming you have a key in the database that will save you from race conditions...

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I need to make sure that generate! generates a code - no matter what, until a unique code has been generated. –  noxoc Aug 10 '12 at 12:55
    
From my point of view that would be in another test. In here you are just testing that it rejects duplicated promocodes. –  Nobita Aug 10 '12 at 12:56
    
Okay. But that's the test I was trying to write in the first place ;) –  noxoc Aug 10 '12 at 12:57
    
@NilsRiedemann Sorry, I understood you wrongly :( –  Nobita Aug 10 '12 at 13:32

If you saves the promocode in database you would have added validations there in the model for uniq promocode. So you can test the same in rspec too.

Like this,

it { should validate_uniqueness_of(:promocode) }
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This answer is based on your comment:

I need to make sure that generate! generates a code - no matter what, until a unique code has been generated.

I feel like you might have a hard time testing this correctly. Unit testing "no matter what" situations with indefinite loops can be a bit of a tricky subject.

I'm not sure how to do this since I can't really stub out the .generate method to return fixed values (because then it would be stuck in an infinite loop).

One possibility to consider might be if instead of doing either one or the other, you tried both? (That is, find a way make it return a fixed number under certain circumstances, and eventually trigger the actual random number. An instance variable counter might help; set it to a random number, count it down, when it's greater than zero return the fixed number, or something along those lines). This still doesn't feel like a perfect test, though, or even a very good one for that matter.

It might be worth looking more into means of generating similar strings with high probability of them being unique, and having some mathematical proof of it being that way. I'm not saying this is the most practical idea either, but if you really need to prove (as you're trying to do with tests), it might be the more probably solution.

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