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This code works as a is in the same scope where eval runs:

function compile(fn) {
    //Actually calls fn.toString() then compiles some es.next type 
    //features to current versions of es.
    return 'function () { return a; }';
}

function runAsStringA() {
    var a = 10;
    var compiled = eval(compile());
    return compiled();
}

This doesn't work, but matches what I'd like to do in an ideal world:

function compile(fn) {
    return eval('function () { return a; }');
}

function runAsStringA() {
    var a = 10;
    var compiled = compile();
    return compiled();
}

Essentially I need a way to eval in the parent's scope.

I tried:

function compile(fn) {
    return eval.bind(this, 'function () { return a; }');
}

function runAsStringA() {
    var a = 10;
    var compiled = compileSpecialFunction()();
    return compiled();
}

The problem is that then the compiled function doesn't get a in scope.

I'm attempting to use this in a node.js environment, so it's fine if a solution only works on node.js

It can even require some native code, although I have no experience writing native add-ons.

share|improve this question
1  
Why do you need this? – Felix Kling Aug 10 '12 at 12:17
1  
Have you looked at the vm module? – Zirak Aug 10 '12 at 12:27
    
@FelixKling I need this because I'm attempting to do cross compilation of JavaScript to JavaScript to add an await keyword that's roughly equivalent to C#'s await and works with Q promises. It's a bit ugly but I've got it working pretty well apart from this. At the moment I'm only using it in node.js so I can pass in all the locals that would normally be available to a module just by giving the module to my compile function. – ForbesLindesay Aug 14 '12 at 14:42
    
@OcuS In general, eval is evil, but there are specialized advanced scenarios where you can't replicate certain functionality without it (unless someone can find a way to do this). What I'm trying to do is at least encapsulate the use of eval so it's not exposed to consumers of my component, because that really would be evil. – ForbesLindesay Aug 14 '12 at 14:43
    
Yes @Zirak it's a cool, and useful, module but unfortunately doesn't seem to have a way to choose the scope in the way I want to. – ForbesLindesay Aug 14 '12 at 14:44
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Unfortunately this seems to be impossible.

share|improve this answer

While I agree that you should avoid eval, and probably veal (as my spell checker suggests), this might help:

function compile(a) {
    return eval('(function(a) { return a; })').call(this, a);;
}

function runAsStringA() {
    var a = 10;
    var compiled = compile(a);
    return compiled;
}

console.log(runAsStringA());
share|improve this answer
    
The problem is that I don't know that it's just a, it could be any variables that are in scope. – ForbesLindesay Aug 10 '12 at 16:33
    
Can you make your variables members of the scope? e.g. this.a = 10; rather than var a = 10; ? – cjohn Aug 10 '12 at 20:57
    
No, I need to compile a function as a string but have it work exactly like regular JavaScript would. – ForbesLindesay Aug 14 '12 at 14:45

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