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I'm trying to implement a generic function that generates a std::string from an id (which is an std::pair<uint32_,uint32_t>).

The function is the following:

typedef uint32_t element_type;

template <element_type type>
std::string to_string (const std::pair<element_type, uint32_t>& id) {
    ....
    const char* name = elemen_type_traits<type>::element_type_name;
    ...
}

I can invoke the function in the following way:

std::cout << to_string<ELEMENT_TYPE_FOO> (foo_0) << std::endl;
std::cout << to_string<ELEMENT_TYPE_FOO> (foo_1) << std::endl;

The only thing is that I want to make sure that the template parameter matches the first field of the std::pair. Is it possible to deduct the parameter value from std::pair.first?

I don't know if it's possible but in the end I would like to have something like this:

std::cout << to_string (foo_0) << std::endl;
std::cout << to_string (foo_1) << std::endl;

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
could you use the pair<> as the template argument instead of the element? –  Gir Aug 10 '12 at 12:28
    
is type is actually a type? It should be a value of type uint32_t, isn't it? –  klm123 Aug 10 '12 at 12:50
    
@Gir I have tried that but without success. I get an error message: no matching function for call to 'to_string' –  user1192525 Aug 10 '12 at 12:55
    
@klm123 type is a value of type_value (which is uint32_t) –  user1192525 Aug 10 '12 at 12:56

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you encode the value inside a type, this is actually achievable:

// C++11 'enum class' emulation, you don't want to leak 'foo' everywhere
// also called a "scoped enum"
struct element_type_value{
   enum type{
     foo = 1337
   };
};

template<element_type_value::type V>
struct element_type{};

template<element_type_value::type V>
std::string to_string(std::pair<element_type<V>, uint32_t> const& /*id*/){
  // ...
  const char* name = element_type_traits<V>::element_type_name;
  // ...
}

Live example.

Of course, this only works if the type is always a statically known value, and actually you don't even need the id.first anymore. However, there's no other way of achieving this check, as far as I know.

I personally would probably drop std::pair and just make a custom struct, together with some other refactoring.

struct element_type{
   enum type{
     foo = 1337
   };
};

template<element_type::type V>
struct element_type_id{
  element_type_id(uint32_t id) : id(id){}
  uint32_t id; // or whatever your original std::pair::second represented
};

template<element_type::type V>
std::string to_string(element_type_id<V> const& /*id*/){
  // ...
  const char* name = element_type_traits<V>::element_type_name;
  // ...
}

Live example.

share|improve this answer

If I understood correctly you can simply write:

std::string to_string (const std::pair<element_type, uint32_t>& id) {
 const element_type type = id.first;
 ....
 const char* name = elemen_type_traits<type>::element_type_name;
 ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is not going to work as you must know 'type' value at compilation time. –  user1192525 Aug 10 '12 at 12:57
    
But the written is correct with respect what you want to do? Then there is no way to do it. Simply because id.first is not known at the compilation time. –  klm123 Aug 10 '12 at 13:03
    
That's why I'm using a template function –  user1192525 Aug 10 '12 at 13:30

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