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I have been recommended to use the second, try-except variant, but I would also like to know what others think: which procedure of the two below (if any) is more time-efficient?

procedure LoadImage(img: TImage; filename: string);
begin
  if fileexists(filename) then
    img.Picture.Loadfromfile(filename)
  else
    img.Picture.Loadfromfile('default.jpg')
end;

or

procedure LoadImage(img: TImage; filename: string);
begin
  try
    img.Picture.Loadfromfile(filename)
  except
    img.Picture.Loadfromfile('default.jpg')
  end
end;
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6  
They're not equivalent. The first one has at least two issues: 1) A race condition 2) If the file exists, but cannot be loaded it'll throw an exception. –  CodesInChaos Aug 10 '12 at 12:27
2  
How often does the first image exist? The first code optimizes the error case, the second the success case. –  CodesInChaos Aug 10 '12 at 12:29
8  
for god's sake, you're loading an image.. don't micro-optimize code which is orders of magnitude faster. –  Karoly Horvath Aug 10 '12 at 12:33
12  
it's not either/or, you should both check whether the file exists and catch errors. I really don't like having program flow defined through try excepts. –  Pieter B Aug 10 '12 at 13:03
6  
Just a recommendation, if you plan to load Default.jpg many times, then it might be a good idea to pre-load this image once and leave it loaded, using the already loaded version every time it's needed, rather than loading it from the file over and over. –  Jerry Dodge Aug 10 '12 at 15:34

3 Answers 3

Forget efficiency. Code readability is way, way more important. Premature optimization is the root of all sorts of evil.

The first one is clear in its intentions. Everyone can easily figure out what is up.

The second one makes me stop and go "What the....?"

You never want your code to cause the second reaction.

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2  
Clear incorrect code should never be preferred over less clear correct code. And no, I'm not saying the second one is correct. –  hvd Aug 10 '12 at 13:20
    
@hvd: "Clear incorrect code should never be preferred over less clear correct code." -- that goes without saying. But of course, correct and clear code is the best. –  Nick Hodges Aug 10 '12 at 13:39
    
Fully agreed. I commented because neither the first nor the second is both, and I read your answer as saying the first is correct. –  hvd Aug 10 '12 at 13:40
    
It depends on the desired semantics if you consider the first correct. Fallback-on-error and fallback-on-missing-file are different, and I don't know which one the OP wants. –  CodesInChaos Aug 10 '12 at 13:44
5  
You haven't answered the question. It's fine to complain that the question was even asked in the first place, but if the complaint isn't going to be accompanied by an answer, then it should be in a comment, no matter how well argued it is. –  Rob Kennedy Aug 10 '12 at 14:42

If time efficiency is your only criteria, first one will be faster because exception handling is CPU consuming.

FileExists() uses one WinApi call so its fast but it checks only if file exists. If file exists but its in wrong format or its blocked by other thread you will get unhandled exception.

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1  
Are you certain the overhead of FileExists() is smaller than that of exception handling? Even if the path may be an UNC path to a slow server? (The difference will probably be small enough that it really doesn't matter which is faster.) –  hvd Aug 10 '12 at 13:13
1  
Exception handling is only expensive if an exception actually is thrown. The try .. except code itself does not slow down the execution. –  mjn Aug 10 '12 at 13:18
    
@mjn At least in old versions of delphi entering a try...except clause does slow down execution. Probably negligible compared to the cost of IO, but you don't want a try except in a tight loop, even if it never actually throws. –  CodesInChaos Aug 10 '12 at 13:22
1  
In Delphi 4 and Delphi 2005, @Codes, entering a try-except block involved two stack pushes and a mov, and I don't think it's changed since. How old are you talking about? –  Rob Kennedy Aug 10 '12 at 14:32
    
Probably Delphi 4 or 6. From what I remember try-except (or perhaps it was try-finally) involved calls to expensive windows API functions related to structured exception handling. –  CodesInChaos Aug 10 '12 at 14:43

One problem with your question is that you didn't specify the desired semantics. There are two possible interpretations, and which solution is better, depends on that choice. I assume being unable to load the fallback, is a fatal error.

  1. If the first file does exist, load it, else load the second. If the first file exists, but could not be loaded, show an error.
  2. If the first file cannot be loaded, fallback to the second.

If you want the semantics of 1) your first code is fine.

If you want the semantics of 2), neither is good. The first code doesn't have these semantics because:

  1. It has a race condition. If the image gets deleted between checking the existence of the file and loading it, it'll fail.
  2. If the file exists, but cannot be loaded, an exception will be thrown. This can happen if the file is no valid image, or cannot be opened.

The second one uses exceptions for a common case, which is bad.

So to achieve the second semantics I'd use:

procedure LoadImage(img: TImage; filename: string);
var success:boolean;
begin
  success := false;
  if FileExists(filename)
    then try
      img.Picture.LoadFromFile(filename);
      success := true;
    except
    end
  if not success
    then img.Picture.LoadFromFile('default.jpg');
end;

Checking for existence before opening makes the error case faster, but the success case slower. So which one is faster depends on your usage.

Personally I'd use the third variant over the second, even if the image is only missing occasionally, since I believe a normally operating application should not throw exceptions. I'd only care about the performance issue if benchmarking revealed it to be noticeable.

You should also consider a more targeted exception clause. Blanket catching all exception is bad style. Unfortunately I couldn't find a clear specification which exceptions are thrown by TPicture.LoadFromFile, so I'll leave in the blanket clause for now.

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2  
Now you first load from filename, and then ditch that to load default.jpg. Missing else. –  hvd Aug 10 '12 at 12:44
2  
I wouldn't use an empty except clause, that's asking for trouble. –  Pieter B Aug 10 '12 at 13:10
9  
NEVER EVER EVER EVER EVER EVER EVER EVER EVER EVER EVER EVER EVER leave and except clause empty. EVER! –  Nick Hodges Aug 10 '12 at 13:14
2  
@NickHodges The code does exactly the same thing as it would if it still contained try LoadFromFile(filename); except LoadFromFile('default.jpg'); end;. I agree that except end is bad, but except LoadFromFile('default.jpg'); end is equally bad. –  hvd Aug 10 '12 at 13:18
2  
I recommended more specific exception filtering, so it only catches IO related exceptions. But I couldn't find a statement in the documentation stating which exceptions this method might throw. Do you have a good source for that? But leaving it empty isn't any worse than what's done in the original question. –  CodesInChaos Aug 10 '12 at 13:19

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