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It's Rails/Ruby. Just wondering if there is a DRYer version to remove the repetition in the following code:

case params[:order]
when 'rating_ascend'
  order = {:order => 'rating_average ASC'}
when 'rating_descend'
  order = {:order => 'rating_average DESC'}
when 'distance'
  order = {:order => 'distance ASC'}
else
  order = {:order => 'distance ASC'}
end

Thanks.

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5 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Or course, there is.

order = case params[:order]
  when 'rating_ascend'
    {:order => 'rating_average ASC'}
  when 'rating_descend'
    {:order => 'rating_average DESC'}
  else
    {:order => 'distance ASC'}
end

Or even this (I wouldn't write like this, but this is DRYer)

order = {:order => case params[:order]
  when 'rating_ascend' then 'rating_average ASC'
  when 'rating_descend' then 'rating_average DESC'
  else 'distance ASC'
end}

When you simplify code to this point, you notice that you have double "distance ASC" result. Is it a typo or intentional?

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Actually I just intended to not duplicate the distance ASC, but you guys refactored even more... No, it's not a type. This order is an optional parameter. –  Victor Aug 10 '12 at 13:27
    
Okay, simplified further :) –  Sergio Tulentsev Aug 10 '12 at 13:29
    
Why wouldn't you write the second method usually? –  Victor Aug 10 '12 at 13:30
    
I find it messy. This is how I'd write it (with temp variable): pastie.org/4449688 –  Sergio Tulentsev Aug 10 '12 at 13:33
    
Thanks. Learnt something today. –  Victor Aug 10 '12 at 13:36
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order = {}
order[:order] = case params[:order]
when "rating_ascend" then "rating_average ASC"
when "rating_descend" then "rating_average DESC"
else "distance ASC"
end
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+1 for remembering about the then keyword. –  Matheus Moreira Aug 10 '12 at 13:03
    
I like it better than semicolon. –  sawa Aug 10 '12 at 13:04
    
Thanks. Learnt something today. –  Victor Aug 10 '12 at 13:37
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orders = {'rating_ascend' =>  'rating_average ASC', 'rating_descend' => 'rating_average DESC', 'distance' => 'distance ASC'}
Model.order(orders[params[:order]] || 'distance ASC')
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Good one, thanks :) –  Sergio Tulentsev Aug 10 '12 at 13:35
    
Thanks. Learnt something today. –  Victor Aug 10 '12 at 13:38
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Using the 'extract method' refactoring pattern:

def determine_order(order)
  case order
  when 'rating_ascend'
    'rating_average ASC'
  when 'rating_descend'
    'rating_average DESC'
  else
    'distance ASC'
end

order = {:order => determine_order(params[:order])}
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You can do like the previous answer, even to make it better just remove the unwanted case

  when 'distance'
    'distance ASC'

since the else part will perform the same.

order = {:order => case params[:order]
  when 'rating_ascend'
    'rating_average ASC'
  when 'rating_descend'
    'rating_average DESC'
  else
    'distance ASC'
end}
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