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I have a very odd problem that I have to assume is because of Yabble.js. I have never used Yabble.js before, and the only reason I am now is because it is a dependency of a library I'm using (Gamejs), but I would love to understand why this happens, and whether it is actually Yabble.js's fault, or possibly Gamejs's.

Here's a heavily compressed (and modified for genericness) version of my main.js:

var gamejs = require('gamejs');
...
function Character(/*lots of arguments*/) {
    Character.superConstructor.apply(this, arguments);
    this.somethingtomakeitaprototypeforthisexample = oneofthearguments;
}
gamejs.utils.objects.extend(Character, gamejs.sprite.Sprite);
Character.prototype.draw = function(display){
    display.blit(this.animator.image, this.pos); 
}
... /*Skipping most of the file, irrelevant to the problem*/

function main() {
    maincharacter = new Character(/* appropriate number and types of arguments */);
    ... /*skipping the rest*/
}

gamejs.ready(main);

I have done enough debugging to know that it gets into the main function no problem and that the break occurs at the call to Character. Here is the error message (from Chrome's console):

Uncaught TypeError: undefined is not a function
  main
  _readyResources

I have determined that Character is the undefined function. However, if I define my ready function thusly:

gamejs.ready(function(){
    console.log('Character:');
    console.log(Character);
    main(); 
});

the full contents of Character, as properly defined, prints out, but I still get the error in main. Thus, I know that Character is defined by the namespace before main is called.

Fun fact though: I do have a workaround. If I change the function prototype for main to:

function main(CharacterClass) {...};

then change the ready function to:

gamejs.ready(function(){ main(Character);  });

and change the relevant line in main to:

var character = new CharacterClass(...);

it works fine. But this feels really hackish.

So my question is not how to make it work, since I have that already, but rather why it is a problem and how to make it work like it's supposed to.

Any thoughts?

share|improve this question
    
did you ever get this to work? If you can make a small test-case for my to try I could help. –  oberhamsi Oct 5 '12 at 14:17
    
I'm pretty sure I ended up giving up and moved on to something else, specifically CraftyJS. –  KenB Oct 5 '12 at 15:53

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