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I have a VB .NET application that uses WCF. I've set the client timeouts for everything in code:

    Dim oMastSrv As MastSvc.IclsIOXferClient = Nothing

    Dim binding As New ServiceModel.NetTcpBinding("NetTcpBinding_IclsIOXfer")
    Dim intTimeout As Integer = 2500
    binding.SendTimeout = New TimeSpan(0, 0, 0, 0, intTimeout)
    binding.ReceiveTimeout = New TimeSpan(0, 0, 0, 0, intTimeout)
    binding.OpenTimeout = New TimeSpan(0, 0, 0, 0, intTimeout)
    binding.CloseTimeout = New TimeSpan(0, 0, 0, 0, intTimeout)
    Dim address As New ServiceModel.EndpointAddress("net.tcp://" & GetSrvIP(intSrvID) & ":30000/MyMastSvc")

    oMastSrv = New MastSvc.IclsIOXferClient(binding, address)
    Try
        oMastSrv.ServiceConnect( ... )
        oMastSrv.InnerChannel.OperationTimeout = New TimeSpan(0, 0, 0, 0, intTimeout)
    Catch ex As Exception
        ...
    End Try

When the service I'm connected to crashes, though, the Endpoint Not Found exception takes over twenty seconds to be thrown, not the 2.5 I have specified. This is really mucking with my load balancing, I need to know that service is gone within 2.5 seconds. Is there any way to get this exception thrown within the desired time span?

BTW, the exception reads something like:

Could not connect to net.tcp://192.168.227.130:30000/MXIOXfer. The connection attempt lasted for a time span of 00:00:02.4209684. TCP error code 10060: A connection attempt failed because the connected party did not properly respond after a period of time, or established connection failed because connected host has failed to respond 192.168.227.130:30000.

but it really does take over twenty seconds. I've turned WCF tracing on and can see the TCP operation failed warning just before the exception and it has the REAL time:

Could not connect to net.tcp://192.168.227.130:30000/MXIOXfer. The connection attempt lasted for a time span of 00:00:21.0314092. TCP error code 10060: A connection attempt failed because the connected party did not properly respond after a period of time, or established connection failed because connected host has failed to respond 192.168.227.130:30000.

If it makes any difference, all the comms to the service are done on separate threads.

EDIT:

This thread seems to indicate that the socket timeouts are set by the operating system. Is there a registry setting for such things?

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1  
The code sample makes it look like the OperationTimeout is being set after the channel is opened. What happens if you move that up to before ServiceConnect()? –  ErnieL Aug 10 '12 at 22:23
    
@ErnieL - Same thing, as does setting it BOTH before and after. After is required to get the timeout to work in regular operation, so that's the one I left in. –  MarkFisher Aug 13 '12 at 12:59

2 Answers 2

I believe this post talks about the same issue: wcf channelfactory and opentimeout.

The problem is the underlying sockets have a default 20s or so timeout that WCF isn't overriding. Check the last answer for a way to implement your own timeout by opening asynchronously.

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That solution is for opening the channel, my problem is the timeout after the channel is successfully opened but the service crashes. Opening the channel each time to be sure the service is still up would be messy; is there an equivalent technique for when the channel is already up? –  MarkFisher Aug 14 '12 at 19:14
    
Another post about this long delay: stackoverflow.com/a/5989738/1539015. It just seems the sockets layer is messing things up. You'd have to do each of your calls to the service in an asynchronous manner and track the timeout yourself... at least from what I've found so far. –  eol Aug 14 '12 at 19:53

Combining the details found in SO and MSDN Social threads referenced by me and eol led me to these registry settings:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\Tcpip\Parameters\Interfaces{xxxxxxxx-xxxx-xxxx-xxxxxxxxxxxx}\TcpInitialRTT

Value Type: REG_DWORD—number

Valid Range: 0–0xFFFF

Default: 3 seconds

Description: This parameter controls the initial time-out used for a TCP connection request and initial data retransmission on a per-interface basis. Use caution when tuning with this parameter because exponential backoff is used. Setting this value to larger than 3 results in much longer time-outs to nonexistent addresses.

.

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\Tcpip\Parameters\Interfaces{xxxxxxxx-xxxx-xxxx-xxxxxxxxxxxx}\TcpMaxConnectRetransmissions

Value Type: REG_DWORD—number

Valid Range: 0–255 (decimal)

Default: 2

Description: This parameter determines the number of times that TCP retransmits a connect request (SYN) before aborting the attempt. The retransmission time-out is doubled with each successive retransmission in a given connect attempt. The initial time-out is controlled by the TcpInitialRtt registry value.

.

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\Tcpip\Parameters\Interfaces{xxxxxxxx-xxxx-xxxx-xxxxxxxxxxxx}\TcpMaxDataRetransmissions

Value Type: REG_DWORD—number

Valid Range: 0–0xFFFFFFFF

Default: 5

Description: This parameter controls the number of times that TCP retransmits an individual data segment (not connection request segments) before aborting the connection. The retransmission time-out is doubled with each successive retransmission on a connection. It is reset when responses resume. The Retransmission Timeout (RTO) value is dynamically adjusted, using the historical measured round-trip time (Smoothed Round Trip Time, or SRTT) on each connection. The starting RTO on a new connection is controlled by the TcpInitialRtt registry value.

Since the timeout value on a failed connect is doubled for each retry, the default values make the first attempt fail in 3 seconds, the second fail in 6, and the third and final attempt fail in 12 seconds, or 21 seconds total. BTW, the TcpMaxDataRetransmissions key has nothing to do with this, I include it for completeness and those who come later.

None of these values are present by default, you have to add them to change them. Figuring out which interface(s) to do this on is easy, each interface has a key containing its current IP address. (There's even one for localhost.) In my own case, just setting the TcpMaxConnectRetransmissions to zero (0) on the VM interfaces defaults my socket timeout for them to 3 seconds, which is close enough to 2.5 to work. My load balancing works when a WCF service crashes now.

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Nice work getting to the root cause. Some cautions to future readers: this is a low level fix that can affect other programs on the same computer. Best used when you have limited purpose machines. Also, I see some posts about this perhaps being deprecated in some newer versions of Windows. Mark, can you let us know which windows OS you're using? –  eol Aug 16 '12 at 17:56
    
@eol - Sure, I'm targeting XP->7 (.NET 4), and MS KBA support.microsoft.com/kb/170359 says it's supported from NT. There are RFCs covering this behavior; if discontinued, MS would have to provide support for it somewhere else. (IMHO, this is a lousy way to do this in the first place.) Could you point to the posts that indicate depreciation? –  MarkFisher Aug 27 '12 at 14:55
1  
I should have done that to begin with. I went back to get the list and found that where I had seen this said in about 4 different places, when I looked closer they were all clones/copies of just one discussion thread (social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/w7itpronetworking/…, two answers down.) Since just one person stated this, and I can't find any other source to corroborate, I retract my statement about possibly being deprecated. –  eol Aug 27 '12 at 18:39

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