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How to delete the string from txt file?

I need to delete the string $number ='441157070315'; from txt file and then rewrite the file. Example of txt file:

441157070314
441157070315
441157070316
441157070317
441157070318

Any suggestions?=\ Perl need)

What I tried:

$number ='441157070315';
open F, "numbers.txt";
my @mas = split( "\n", readTextFile( "numbers.txt" ) );
#I don't know what do next
close F;


sub readTextFile {
   open(local *FILE, "<$_[0]") or return;
   local $/;
   return scalar <FILE>;
}
share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Toto, dgw, friedo, Borodin, Brad Larson Aug 10 '12 at 18:22

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Do you have to do it in perl? Something like sed would be a lot simpler. –  Gordon Bailey Aug 10 '12 at 13:47
4  
duplicate of 11902670 –  pavel Aug 10 '12 at 13:56

5 Answers 5

in a one-liner:

perl -ni -e 'print unless /^441157070315$/' numbers.txt
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This should work:

my $number = '441157070315';
open IN_FILE, "numbers.txt" or die "error opening input file!";
open OUT_FILE, ">out_file_name.txt" or die "error opening output file!";

while (<IN_FILE>)
{
    #print lines that don't contain $number to the out file.
    print OUT_FILE unless (/$number/);
}
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1  
You might want to put anchors on that regex. Otherwise it will match lines where your number is part of a longer one. And why is your number a string? –  Dave Cross Aug 10 '12 at 14:06
    
@Dave, the declaration of $number is copied from the question. It doesn't really make a difference; the regex is certainly going to treat it as a string anyway. As for the anchors, I'm not sure the question really specifies what should happen in the case you mention. –  dan1111 Aug 10 '12 at 15:05
1  
@DaveCross: The number is a string because the inpput is a string. If I wanted to delete the line 000000000000 it would be pointless to write my $number = 000000000000 –  Borodin Aug 10 '12 at 17:40
    
@dan1111: Better to chomp and write unless $_ eq $number –  Borodin Aug 10 '12 at 17:41

Pavel's answer is the one you should accept. But I wanted to point out a minor improvement to your code.

Your readTextFile() function returns a string containing the text from the file. You then need to use split to split that text into a list to store in your array. But if you removed the scalar from the last line of your function, it would return a list of records from the file which you can store directly in the array without needing the split.

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1  
Removing the sub altogether would be better still. All it does is duplicate functionality that is already handled elegantly by Perl's core functions. –  dan1111 Aug 13 '12 at 8:32

If you need output in the same file and you have to use only perl. thn here goes -

$number ='441157070315';
open F, "numbers.txt";
my @mas = split( "\n", readTextFile( "numbers.txt" ) );
close F;

open W, ">numbers.txt";
foreach my $line(@mas)
{
    print W $line unless /$number/;
}
close W;



sub readTextFile {
   open(local *FILE, "<$_[0]") or return;
   local $/;
   return scalar <FILE>;
}

else using something like sed will be much better.

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$^I = '.bak';

$number = '441157070315';
@ARGV = 'numbers.txt';
while (<>) {
    s/$number//g;
    next if /^\s+$/g;
    print;
}
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Thank's a lot. It's working. Only one, how to delete the bak file, i don't need it. –  user1577194 Aug 10 '12 at 14:32

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