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I am trying to understand how a Callable is able to return a value when it is run on a different thread.

I am looking in the classes Executors, AbstractExecutorService, ThreadPoolExecutor and FutureTask, all available in java.util.concurrent package.

You create an ExecutorService object by calling a method in Executors (e.g. newSingleThreadExecutor()). Then you can pass a Callable object with ExecutorService.submit(Callable c)

Since the call() method is run by a thread provided by the ExecutorService, where does the returned object "jump" back to the calling thread?

Look at this simple example:

1    ExecutorService executor = Executors.newSingleThreadExecutor();
2    public static void main(String[] args) {
3       Integer i = executor.submit(new Callable<Integer>(){
4           public Integer call() throws Exception {
5              return 10;
6           }
7       }).get();
8       System.out.print("Return value: "+i+ " Thread: "+Thread.currentThread.getName());  // prints "10 main"
9    }

How is it possible that the integer in the call method, which is run by a separate thread, is returned to the Integer object (row 3) so it can be printed by the System.out statement in the main thread (row 7)?

Isn´t it possible for the main thread to be run before the ExecutorService has run its thread, so that the System.out statement prints null?

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There are a few compilation errors in this code; for example, executor.submit returns a Future, not an Integer, and currentThread is a method that needs to be called. If anyone cares to see a working example, see ideone.com/myoMB –  Ray Toal Aug 10 '12 at 14:25
    
Sorry, I was writing that code by hand. :-) I will have a look at your example. –  Rox Aug 10 '12 at 14:40
    
Oh no problem, I was just trying to be helpful. It is a good question. +1 –  Ray Toal Aug 10 '12 at 15:15

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

How is it possible that the integer in the call method, which is run by a separate thread, is returned to the Integer object

ExecutorService.submit(...) does not return the object from call() but it does return a Future<Integer> and you can use the Future.get() method to get that object. See the example code below.

Isn´t it possible for the main thread to be run before the ExecutorService has run its thread, so that the System.out statement prints null?

No, the get() method on the future waits until the job finishes. If call() returned null then get() will otherwise it will return (and print) 10 guaranteed.

Future<Integer> future = executor.submit(new Callable<Integer>(){
    public Integer call() throws Exception {
       return 10;
    }
});
try {
   // get() waits for the job to finish before returning the value
   // it also might throw an exception if your call() threw
   Integer i = future.get();
   ...
} catch (ExecutionException e) {
   // this cause exception is the one thrown by the call() method
   Exception cause = e.getCause();
   ...
}
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Thank you for your answer! Where does the wait occur? It must be some synchronization so that the calling thread (e.g. main thread) can wait for the ExecutorService to complete its task. I have looked in FutureTask and in ThreadPoolExecutor and cannod see such synchronization. –  Rox Aug 11 '12 at 9:32
    
Does it work like this, that the main thread enters the Future.get() method before the ExecutorService enters the RunnableFuture.run() method, but the main method has to wait for the ExecutorService to complete the run() method and when it has, it notifys the main thread to go on with the get() method? –  Rox Aug 11 '12 at 10:36
2  
The Future.get() does the waiting. Inside of FutureTask I believe the acquireSharedInterruptibly(0) and then call doAcquireSharedInterruptibly(...) does the synchronization and waiting. The synchronization is done with volatile. –  Gray Aug 11 '12 at 12:55
1  
The get() method can be called at any time. It must be called after the job has been submitted but this can be before it starts executing -- before the run() or call() methods have been executed. The Future.get() method waits for the job to be completed and any Callable return value or Runnable or Callable exception to be thrown and captured. –  Gray Aug 11 '12 at 12:57

Have a look on ExecutorService.submit() method :

<T> Future<T> submit(Callable<T> task) : Submits a value-returning task for execution and returns a Future representing the pending results of the task. The Future's get method will return the task's result upon successful completion. If you would like to immediately block waiting for a task, you can use constructions of the form result = exec.submit(aCallable).get();


Q. Isn´t it possible for the main thread to be run before the ExecutorService has run its thread, so that the System.out statement prints null?

--> Future<T>.get() Waits if necessary for the computation to complete, and then retrieves its result.

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Thanks for answering. Look at my question to Gray´s answer. Where does the synchronization take place so that the main thread can wait for the ExecutorService to complete its task? –  Rox Aug 11 '12 at 9:34

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